Addenda 1: After Pragmatic 40

1 November, 2014

ARCHIVED

Following Pragmatic Episode 40 the fan-voted favourite Q and A jingle was coined (inadvertently) and John walked through the reasoning behind the recent additions to Pragmatic on the website surrounding topic voting.

Transcript available
Q&A Q&A Q&A Q&A Q&A Q&A Q&A *sigh* Do I leave that in? Show of hands Um... *laughs* Shhh... Damn it, fuck, damn it, I can't see your hands! Hang on No, I still can't see them Alright This is what happens when I'm overtired *laughs* And I'm at Kelphie and I'm overtired It was entertaining Was it? Oh god Oh my god There's two votes for yes. There's two votes for yes, what? Yes, yes. Oh, yes, there's a yes in the chat room. Thanks, guys. You're right. Yes is the text equivalent of showing your hand. Oh, my God. Hey, nice one. There we go. Thank you. I see some hands there, the emoji going. That's great. Yeah, somebody wants you, Clinton wants you to add that before every Q&A. I'll see what I can do, Clinton, just for you, but only because it's you asking. It was a nice little jingle. It was a nice jingle? Oh my God. Okay. One of these days I'm going to do a... Hang on. I was going to say, I was going to do a podcast where I just ramble on. Oh my God. I need to shut up and focus on the Q&A. I'm just going to let that one fly right past. I know. I know. I know. I'm just... I'm digging more holes. I'm doing a great job tonight of digging holes. Okay, yeah, actually, you know, before we do the Q&A, let's have a quick look at titles, actually, if there's been any suggestions. There's been a lot of them. I need to do more of this voting and discussing with the chat room, actually, for titles and stuff. Holy crap, my crap, that's a lot. Wow. I told you there'd been several. Yeah. Hey, great work guys in the chat room. John's job joys. I remember saying that. Who would trust that chichi guy? Yeah, that's a good one. I wouldn't. I like I can't get no focus. I can't get no focus. That's good. I'm voting for that one. Every job sucks. Yeah, it does. Does Tristan. Negative feedback culture. See, that's not funny. Meaningless token word. Meaningless token award. Yes, that's a good one. The opposite of enjoyment. Yes, writing Word documents makes me happy. See, the problem is that makes it sound like writing Word documents makes me happy and it does not make me happy. To perpetuate. I really don't think it makes anyone happy. No, perpetuate bad English. I do like that, but it's not really descriptive about what we talked about, I don't think so much, but it is funny. So yeah, jump in there and vote for a few of those. I've thrown my hat in the ring and I'm going to pick from whichever is the highest voted. Which, yeah, because sometimes I start an episode and I've got a clear one in mind and other times I start and I'm just drawing a blank. Tonight I'm drawing a blank. So thank you chatroom, go for it. Okay, so now, apostrophe Q, I swear I am going to update that show but I've just been pouring so much time into the membership that I haven't. And you know what really stinks and I say stinks I don't mean it badly I mean what really is frustrating is that for two and a half months I've been waiting for the membership updates from Statomic and honestly they delivered some of them like the password reset is the big one and I was holding off on implementing those features and I waited and waited and waited and I finally released it and guess what? They release it, I kid you not, their blog entry went up within 60 minutes of my update going live on the website. So I'm now testing 1.9, version 1.9 of Statomic on my local host and I will be updating, I'll be applying that to the website as soon as I can. It has the password reset functionality that I have sought after for a while and make things a little bit cleaner with passwords and a few other bits and bobs that are nice to have. So anyway, all right. And yes, Clinton, in answer to your question from an hour ago, I have to validate your email address. Although I suppose I could hack it just for you, I'm not gonna validate it, lazy boy. Okay, let's see. I can only get away with talking to Clinton like that because we've done so many podcast episodes together. But anyway, yeah, one day I might get back into developing apps again, I don't know, we'll see. but for the moment, no, I'm focusing on pragmatic and I'm focusing on features that try and make the show better. So that's one of the other things. I'm really curious about some real-time feedback about what you think about what I've done. I spent a lot of time working on it because Statomic did not support all of these features out of the box. And frankly, even with a 1.9 update, it still doesn't. So once I've reinstated some of my hacks to make it work, I'll update to version 1.9 live on the server. But till then, it still works as it is. It's been pretty thoroughly tested and should work alright. And I guess what I'm trying to do is I'm trying to make sure that people have the opportunity to put forward suggestions for what they'd like to hear. I am not running out of ideas. I've got plenty of ideas. there's a whole bunch of titles on the show, there's a whole bunch of titles and things, topics, sorry, topics for me to look at, to talk about that I could go on about for hours. And that's great, but I wanna talk about the stuff that you want me to talk about. And I feel like there's a presumption that, okay, if you split down, this is part of my thinking, right, is that if you split down an audience of people listening to your show, And none of this is going in the episode, guys. So this is just between us. Is if you split down the listeners of a show into those that listen just because they like listening to me or they like listening to Vic or they like to listening to me and other guests and whatever, it doesn't matter the topic. They just like listening. Then it doesn't matter. The membership thing, the topic thing, it makes no difference because you'll show up and listen because you enjoy listening to the people, the personalities and that's fine, that's okay. But I always said from the beginning with Pragmatic, I want to do it differently. I want to give people the choice. I want to say, you know what, if you don't want to listen to radio, stuff about radio, don't. You know, if you don't listen to the follow-up about radio because you didn't want to listen to the original show about radio, don't. You don't have to. I don't expect you to download and listen to every single episode. I mean, hey, if you do, I love you, Fantastic. That's awesome. And that's great. But you know what? Not everyone's going to like all the things that I like, and I don't want to make someone feel like they have to skip 20 minutes of follow up to get to the topic they want to listen to, or worse than that, feel like, you know, they've had five episodes in a row of Pragmatic about topics they don't care about. And if that's the case, then this is an opportunity to give people to give me some feedback and say what they would like to hear about. Yeah. And the funny thing is I can't tell what other well I say the funny thing is I can't tell other people thinking I'm not psychic and we're not the bore collective yet but I could see it happen one day anyway till that happens I can't read other people's minds so if there's something that you want me to talk about you know tell me and the funny thing I found this is the funny bit is that I tell someone tells me oh be really great if you did a show on this and I'm like oh okay well You're the only person that's asked for it, I'll throw it out there. I flirt the idea with a few other people and they're like, oh, that'd be great. And I'm like, really? People want to know about that stuff? Like, OK. Yeah. Because I'm not- I am- I won't say I'm the worst gauge, but I'm sure as shit not the best gauge of what other people want me to talk about. Yeah. You know? So, I mean, I'm more than happy to talk about the machines that I've programmed. For example, I had someone come ask me to do that and the feedback form. They said, "Oh, I'd love to hear about some of the machines you've programmed." Like the Bradbury Press or the Borrowed Bricks setting machine or the D-Hacker or some of the pipelines I've done or the water treatment plants or wastewater treatment plants, telemetry systems. Go in depth and talk about how they work, how they go together. I've had requests a couple now about talking about coal-fired power stations, like the different power stations I've worked at and how they're put together and how that all works. I've touched on some of that in the past, but I haven't really gone in depth in it because I didn't think it would be interested. I didn't think anyone would be interested in that detail. So, this is an opportunity for people to say, well, you know what, John, we would like to hear about that. That'd be awesome. Or I put the idea out there, it gets no votes. Well, message received. Got it. I'll put it down the bottom of the list. So, that's the hope anyway.
Duration 9 minutes and 16 seconds Direct Download

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People


John Chidgey

John Chidgey

John is an Electrical, Instrumentation and Control Systems Engineer, software developer, podcaster, vocal actor and runs TechDistortion and the Engineered Network. John is a Chartered Professional Engineer in both Electrical Engineering and Information, Telecommunications and Electronics Engineering (ITEE) and a semi-regular conference speaker.

John has produced and appeared on many podcasts including Pragmatic and Causality and is available for hire for Vocal Acting or advertising. He has experience and interest in HMI Design, Alarm Management, Cyber-security and Root Cause Analysis.

Described as the David Attenborough of disasters, and a Dreamy Narrator with Great Pipes by the Podfather Adam Curry.

You can find him on the Fediverse and on Twitter.

Vic Hudson

Vic Hudson

Vic is the host of the App Story Podcast and is the developer behind Money Pilot for iOS.