Pragmatic 113: Whack Me In The Face

25 January, 2024

CURRENT

Vic joins John to go discuss the new iPhone 15 Pro Max Lenses for photos and video, using the Meta Quest 3 and trying out the Fuji Real3D Camera vs iPhone 15 Pro Max Spatial Videos in anticipation of the upcoming Apple Vision Pro.

Transcript available
John: Not my first rodeo. It's my second. 00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:02,560 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:00:00,000 --> 00:00:10,000 John: Pragmatic is a show about technology and contemplating the finer details in their 00:00:02,560 --> 00:00:22,860 John: practical application. By exploring the real-world trade-offs, we dive into how 00:00:22,860 --> 00:00:26,220 John: great ideas can be transformed into products and services that impact our lives. 00:00:26,220 --> 00:00:30,360 John: Pragmatic is entirely supported by you, our listeners. If you'd like to support us and 00:00:30,360 --> 00:00:34,160 John: keep the show ad-free, you can by becoming a Premium Supporter. Premium Support is available 00:00:34,160 --> 00:00:39,340 John: via Patreon and through the Apple Podcasts channel subscription. Premium Supporters have 00:00:39,340 --> 00:00:43,620 John: access to early release, high-quality versions of episodes, as well as bonus material from 00:00:43,620 --> 00:00:47,620 John: all of our shows not available anywhere else. Just visit engineer.network/pragmatic to learn 00:00:47,620 --> 00:00:52,660 John: how you can help this show to continue to be made. Thank you. I'm your host, John Chidjie, 00:00:52,660 --> 00:00:57,900 John: and today I'm joined again once again by my good friend Vic Hudson. How you doing, Vic? 00:00:57,900 --> 00:01:03,020 Vic: >> I'm good, John, how are you? 00:01:00,000 --> 00:01:02,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:02,000 --> 00:01:08,000 John: Not too bad. I'm enjoying the podcasting booth, aka sweatbox. It's the middle of summer. The 00:01:03,020 --> 00:01:09,100 Vic: >> Mm-hm. 00:01:08,000 --> 00:01:09,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:09,000 --> 00:01:17,000 John: air conditioning has not plumbed in properly yet, and hence, oh dear. But that's okay. 00:01:09,100 --> 00:01:14,340 John: It's going to be sweaty, but it's going to be good. Tell me. But you see, you're talking 00:01:14,340 --> 00:01:29,380 Vic: I will trade you weather if you'd like. 00:01:17,000 --> 00:01:19,500 Vic: Do you know what I woke up to this morning? 00:01:19,500 --> 00:01:22,000 Vic: Snow and three degrees Fahrenheit. 00:01:22,000 --> 00:01:25,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:01:25,000 --> 00:01:28,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:28,000 --> 00:01:31,000 John: to the man that used to live in Calgary, mate. I mean, the only thing I didn't like about 00:01:29,380 --> 00:01:33,420 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:01:31,000 --> 00:01:32,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:32,000 --> 00:01:38,000 John: the snow was de-icing my car in the morning in the car park. That's the only thing I didn't 00:01:33,420 --> 00:01:38,260 Vic: Yeah, that blows, that blows really bad. 00:01:38,000 --> 00:01:41,000 John: like. Yeah. Anyway, having said that, I also miss the mountains, and snow is beautiful 00:01:38,260 --> 00:01:46,820 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:41,000 --> 00:01:46,000 Vic: It is pretty through the window, through the window. 00:01:46,000 --> 00:01:50,000 John: in its own way. Except when you... Yeah. Yes. When you're trying to get somewhere and there's 00:01:46,820 --> 00:01:53,540 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:01:50,000 --> 00:01:52,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:52,000 --> 00:01:56,000 John: a foot of it on the ground, it's less good. But anyway. So I've got a whole bunch of stuff 00:01:53,540 --> 00:02:00,100 Vic: Yeah, it's a lot less good then. 00:01:56,000 --> 00:01:58,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:01:58,000 --> 00:02:03,000 John: I wanted to cover today. I do have a primary topic. Okay. I do have a primary topic, sort 00:02:00,100 --> 00:02:06,380 Vic: What you got, man? 00:02:03,000 --> 00:02:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:05,000 --> 00:02:14,000 John: of. But it's all got to do with... You can't call it 3D, right? You've got to call it spatial. 00:02:06,380 --> 00:02:14,020 Vic: Spatial computing, spatial computing. 00:02:14,000 --> 00:02:18,000 John: But we'll get to that. 3D video. But we'll get to that. Yes, that's it. Indeed. I do 00:02:14,020 --> 00:02:21,060 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:18,000 --> 00:02:22,000 John: all my computing spatially. Oh God, please. I'll call it whatever the hell I want. Expensive 00:02:21,060 --> 00:02:34,940 Vic: You should also not call it Vision Pro, the Vision Pro. 00:02:22,000 --> 00:02:26,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:02:26,000 --> 00:02:28,000 Vic: You have to call it Apple Vision Pro. 00:02:28,000 --> 00:02:31,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:31,000 --> 00:02:38,000 John: doorstop. There's another name it may get. Anyway, let's keep going. There's other things 00:02:34,940 --> 00:02:40,100 Vic: Mm, continue, I'm intrigued. 00:02:38,000 --> 00:02:41,000 John: to talk about first. Okay. So just... I touched on it briefly. I have an issue with sound 00:02:40,100 --> 00:02:47,900 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:41,000 --> 00:02:49,000 John: booth cooling. So I have the air conditioning unit, and I have some of the parts necessary 00:02:47,900 --> 00:02:52,220 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:49,000 --> 00:02:59,000 John: that I acquired over the holidays. And anyway, unfortunately for me, I don't really have... 00:02:52,220 --> 00:02:59,820 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:02:59,000 --> 00:03:24,000 John: How do I put this? I don't have all of the last pieces for me to make a start on it. 00:02:59,820 --> 00:03:06,540 John: Therefore, I haven't done anything about it. So I'm still on a non-air conditioned sound 00:03:06,540 --> 00:03:10,580 John: booth. And there's one other tiny problem. I have no air conditioning in the rest of 00:03:10,580 --> 00:03:14,820 John: my house. My wife spotted a air conditioning unit sitting next to the podcasting booth, 00:03:14,820 --> 00:03:20,060 John: not doing anything. It's the middle of summer. It's 90 degrees Fahrenheit out there regularly. 00:03:20,060 --> 00:03:25,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:03:24,000 --> 00:03:30,000 John: So she says, "Well, can't have air conditioning units. Could be doing something constructive." 00:03:25,000 --> 00:03:29,220 John: I'm like, "Yeah, it could be." And so it disappeared into the house. I think that it's borrowed. 00:03:29,220 --> 00:03:36,700 Vic: She stole it, she stole it. 00:03:30,000 --> 00:03:34,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:03:34,000 --> 00:03:38,000 John: It's borrowed. And I borrowed it back just for this morning's recording. So there you 00:03:36,700 --> 00:03:40,380 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:03:38,000 --> 00:03:51,000 John: go. So I've cooled down the inside of the sound booth, and we're good to go. As soon 00:03:40,380 --> 00:03:44,020 John: as I start to melt into a puddle, we'll take a break. But I don't know. I'm tough. I can 00:03:44,020 --> 00:03:49,940 John: handle this. I say now. Okay. Right. So just a note about that, but we'll move on. I'm 00:03:49,940 --> 00:03:57,100 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:03:51,000 --> 00:04:01,000 John: hoping in the next month or two, I'll be able to finish this job because honestly, when 00:03:57,100 --> 00:04:00,660 John: the air conditioning is running in here, it really is quite pleasant. It's just I can't 00:04:00,660 --> 00:04:03,940 John: close the door because there's no exit hole. I got to cut one into the side of it, put 00:04:03,940 --> 00:04:07,580 John: the baffle boxes on. It's on the to-do list. Anyway. All right. So next bit of news that 00:04:07,580 --> 00:04:15,460 John: happened since last time is I finally have solar power back again at my house. I've got 00:04:15,460 --> 00:04:20,700 John: 10 kilowatts installed. I mean, technically it's 13.2 kilowatts of panels, and I've got 00:04:20,700 --> 00:04:26,820 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:04:21,000 --> 00:04:28,000 John: 10 kilowatt three phase inverter. And it's a beautiful system. They're new panels. They've 00:04:26,820 --> 00:04:31,740 Vic: Mm. 00:04:28,000 --> 00:04:31,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:04:31,000 --> 00:04:45,000 John: been installed much better than the previous panels. And I'm producing something like 80. 00:04:31,740 --> 00:04:37,900 John: I think yesterday was a sunny day. I had 82 kilowatt hours in one day. Very impressive. 00:04:37,900 --> 00:04:44,620 John: So because I can't, yeah. Yeah. I could, yes. If I had batteries, I could run the house 00:04:44,620 --> 00:04:58,900 Vic: That sounds impressive. 00:04:45,000 --> 00:04:48,000 Vic: For those of us that don't speak kilowatt hours, like, what are we looking at here? 00:04:48,000 --> 00:04:53,000 Vic: Can you run the whole house with that, and for how long? 00:04:53,000 --> 00:05:00,000 John: indefinitely provided I was getting, yeah, I was getting, yeah, but I'd have to have 00:04:58,900 --> 00:05:04,740 Vic: Nice. 00:05:00,000 --> 00:05:02,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:05:02,000 --> 00:05:09,000 John: batteries that could do probably 20 kilowatt hour of storage, which I realized the whole 00:05:04,740 --> 00:05:12,420 Vic: Uh-huh. 00:05:09,000 --> 00:05:11,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:05:11,000 --> 00:05:21,000 John: thing with storage and capacity has all been messed up thanks to vehicles and stuff. So 00:05:12,420 --> 00:05:17,900 John: technically we measure things in amp hours and such because voltage determines power, 00:05:17,900 --> 00:05:22,780 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:05:21,000 --> 00:05:44,000 John: but nevermind. Doesn't matter. Bottom line is I don't have batteries because they're 00:05:22,780 --> 00:05:27,420 John: a little bit pricey still. So maybe someday I'll get a power wall or more likely a cheaper, 00:05:27,420 --> 00:05:35,060 John: equally good Chinese version because they've got some really good ones coming out of China. 00:05:35,060 --> 00:05:40,100 John: Keeping in keeping note that my Tesla model three has Chinese battery packs in it. Right. 00:05:40,100 --> 00:05:45,180 Vic: Right, that's cool. 00:05:44,000 --> 00:05:47,000 John: So the LFP anyway, nevermind. Yeah. Yep. That's right. So my last power bill, yeah. My last 00:05:45,180 --> 00:06:00,580 Vic: Do you, you at least have the thing like where your electric meter runs backwards sometimes, 00:05:47,000 --> 00:05:53,000 Vic: and you get credit from the power company, right? 00:05:53,000 --> 00:05:57,000 Vic: That's sweet. 00:05:57,000 --> 00:05:59,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:05:59,000 --> 00:06:09,000 John: power bill at this point in time for two months, I think my electricity's cost me a hundred 00:06:00,580 --> 00:06:06,380 John: bucks for two months, which previously it was costing me about $800. So the solar system 00:06:06,380 --> 00:06:13,660 John: is making an enormous difference. And I've been charging the car on solar just by using 00:06:13,660 --> 00:06:18,820 John: a bunch of automations, which are probably going to go away. And then I signed up to 00:06:18,820 --> 00:06:22,540 John: something that we're testing at work, which gives me 8 cents a kilowatt hour charging, 00:06:22,540 --> 00:06:27,180 John: which is pretty cool for my Tesla. But so yeah. But because I'm the sort of, well, a 00:06:27,180 --> 00:06:33,820 John: person that I am, I'm also going to go to my absolute limit as permitted by Queensland 00:06:33,820 --> 00:06:40,900 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:06:39,000 --> 00:06:41,000 John: law, which is 15 kilowatts. So I've got another five kilowatt system I'm waiting for final 00:06:40,900 --> 00:06:46,420 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:06:41,000 --> 00:06:51,000 John: approval from the electricity authority that's Energex. So hopefully that gets approved in 00:06:46,420 --> 00:06:51,100 Vic: What's involved in that approval? 00:06:51,000 --> 00:06:54,000 John: the next few weeks and installed sometime late February. That would be cool. And then 00:06:51,100 --> 00:06:55,860 Vic: You expect any, what's involved in that approval? 00:06:54,000 --> 00:06:56,000 John: it'll, I'll have even more. Sorry. Well, no. So the story was that about a year ago, we 00:06:55,860 --> 00:07:07,140 Vic: Do you expect any trouble, or is it just formalities? 00:06:56,000 --> 00:06:59,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:06:59,000 --> 00:07:09,000 John: applied to have a 15 kilowatt system installed. Actually it was more like 18 months ago and 00:07:07,140 --> 00:07:12,900 John: Energex rejected it because our house, when we got three phase power connected, it was 00:07:12,900 --> 00:07:18,180 John: actually connected up by three independent phases, one from each path, one from each 00:07:18,180 --> 00:07:24,460 John: feeder that came through different physical pathways, which is a big no, no. You can do 00:07:24,460 --> 00:07:29,900 John: it, but you really shouldn't. You can get away with it in residential because generally 00:07:29,900 --> 00:07:34,540 John: you don't have balanced three phase machines. Whereas in an industrial environment, that 00:07:34,540 --> 00:07:39,660 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:07:39,000 --> 00:07:59,000 John: would never work because you try and hook up phases A, B and C to an induction motor 00:07:39,660 --> 00:07:43,300 John: and it would just, you'd probably destroy the motor. So anyway, at some point they realized 00:07:43,300 --> 00:07:50,380 John: that that was only temporary and unbeknownst to us, we saw them doing a whole bunch of 00:07:50,380 --> 00:07:54,200 John: upgrades to transformers on like pole mount transformers on the streets. And we had power 00:07:54,200 --> 00:08:01,380 Vic: Right. 00:07:59,000 --> 00:08:01,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:08:01,000 --> 00:08:11,000 John: outages at our house, multiple power outages, and they pulled a new three phase cable into 00:08:01,380 --> 00:08:05,180 John: our house. And this all just happened. I didn't ask them to do it. They just did it, which 00:08:05,180 --> 00:08:10,500 John: is one of the great things about having an electricity authority that's actually on the 00:08:10,500 --> 00:08:14,740 John: ball and for all of the crap that people give Energex, they were on the ball and they were 00:08:14,740 --> 00:08:19,180 John: fixing up this hack job solution that they had. 00:08:19,180 --> 00:08:22,300 John: Now, as soon as they did that, of course, knowing what I know, I'm looking at the rating 00:08:22,300 --> 00:08:26,740 John: of the transformers because that's what people do when you walk down the street, you look 00:08:26,740 --> 00:08:30,020 John: up and you say, "Oh wow, that's 100 kVA and that's 150. Okay, interesting." Anyway, I 00:08:30,020 --> 00:08:36,780 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:08:31,000 --> 00:08:35,000 Vic: I always do that. 00:08:35,000 --> 00:08:37,000 John: know normal people. Yes, I know. Yeah, totally. Yeah. And then you run into the pole and you're 00:08:36,780 --> 00:08:43,500 Vic: Sometimes I get distracted staring at them while I'm driving. 00:08:37,000 --> 00:08:41,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:08:41,000 --> 00:08:44,000 John: like, "Oh, but yes." Anyhow, yeah. Anyway, listeners know that Vic has not done that, 00:08:43,500 --> 00:08:49,940 Vic: Right? 00:08:44,000 --> 00:08:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:08:46,000 --> 00:08:56,000 John: so I'm just kidding. Anyhow, moving on. 00:08:49,940 --> 00:08:53,900 John: So I went back to Energex with a new application and the rules had changed since I did the 00:08:53,900 --> 00:08:58,980 John: last application and I had to split the system into two pieces, a 10 kW and a 5 kW. And so 00:08:58,980 --> 00:09:05,580 John: the 10 kW got approved and the 5 kW got lost in the system. So the 10 kW got installed 00:09:05,580 --> 00:09:12,860 John: and I'm still waiting for the 5 kW. Now, because they've upgraded all of the backend, it should 00:09:12,860 --> 00:09:18,300 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:09:16,000 --> 00:09:25,000 John: just go ahead. It should, but I don't know what's going to happen. We'll see. So hopefully, 00:09:18,300 --> 00:09:28,420 Vic: Right. 00:09:25,000 --> 00:09:26,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:09:26,000 --> 00:09:32,000 John: we'll find out soon. Hopefully, it is just a formality. All right? 00:09:28,420 --> 00:09:35,900 Vic: That's cool, that's cool. 00:09:32,000 --> 00:09:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:09:34,000 --> 00:09:45,000 John: The one thing I did do, creatively speaking at least, over the break, the Christmas holidays, 00:09:35,900 --> 00:09:41,060 John: is I did an episode of Pragmatic Electric, which I hadn't done in a while. I did an episode 00:09:41,060 --> 00:09:46,260 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:09:45,000 --> 00:09:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:09:46,000 --> 00:09:56,000 John: of... So now I made 10 episodes of Pragmatic Electric. That is a video version of this 00:09:46,260 --> 00:09:50,620 John: podcast about DC charging infrastructure. This particular episode is very locally focused. 00:09:50,620 --> 00:09:58,300 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:09:56,000 --> 00:10:11,000 John: So if you're not in Southeast Queensland or even Queensland as the state, you're probably 00:09:58,300 --> 00:10:04,340 John: not going to care. But it's really been wonderful to see there's been a massive rollout of charging 00:10:04,340 --> 00:10:10,880 John: infrastructure. Well, you can certainly do that, and I would 00:10:10,880 --> 00:10:15,740 Vic: What if we wanna watch it just to see Chigi? 00:10:11,000 --> 00:10:14,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:14,000 --> 00:10:17,000 John: encourage you to do so. The video itself has had an enormous 49 views as of last night. 00:10:15,740 --> 00:10:21,580 Vic: Okay. 00:10:17,000 --> 00:10:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:18,000 --> 00:10:38,000 John: I think I checked it was. So I've almost cracked 50 views. Anyway, it's not a big thing. It's 00:10:21,580 --> 00:10:27,300 John: just something to do to scratch that creativity itch and sort of thing. I figure that having 00:10:27,300 --> 00:10:32,620 John: that on this show and going into all those details is probably not of very much interest 00:10:32,620 --> 00:10:36,420 John: to the audience of this particular podcast. So if you want to, there'll be a link in the 00:10:36,420 --> 00:10:40,500 Vic: Mm. 00:10:38,000 --> 00:10:39,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:39,000 --> 00:10:43,000 John: show notes. Feel free to check it out. When I was doing... Why thank you, Vic. Oh, dear. 00:10:40,500 --> 00:10:52,900 Vic: I'll post about it. 00:10:43,000 --> 00:10:44,000 Vic: Should get you at least two, three more views. 00:10:44,000 --> 00:10:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:46,000 --> 00:10:48,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:10:48,000 --> 00:10:51,000 Vic: I do what I can, man. 00:10:51,000 --> 00:10:52,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:52,000 --> 00:10:53,000 John: Oh, no, I know. It's awesome. So honestly, I just wanted to say about EVs, I came across 00:10:52,900 --> 00:10:59,860 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:10:53,000 --> 00:11:17,000 John: this in the last couple of weeks. I've been back at work now for two through three weeks 00:10:59,860 --> 00:11:06,940 John: now. So I only had that one week over Christmas, a week and a half. You take the days off between 00:11:06,940 --> 00:11:13,060 John: Christmas Day and New Year's Day and call it a holiday when it's really not because 00:11:13,060 --> 00:11:20,140 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:11:17,000 --> 00:11:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:11:18,000 --> 00:11:23,000 John: you're running around going to family events and you're like, "Yeah, okay." Anyway, no, 00:11:20,140 --> 00:11:26,500 Vic: There's not a lot of rest involved. 00:11:23,000 --> 00:11:25,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:11:25,000 --> 00:11:29,000 John: that's the problem. I want a holiday where I can rest. Anyway, it's all good, really. 00:11:26,500 --> 00:11:32,940 Vic: Right. 00:11:29,000 --> 00:11:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:11:30,000 --> 00:11:45,000 John: All right. So I came across this article because there's a lot of electric vehicle hate, I 00:11:32,940 --> 00:11:40,060 John: would say. I think it's a fair way of putting it. And so the hate is going to hate, hate, 00:11:40,060 --> 00:11:44,620 John: hate, said Tay Tay. And anyway, yeah, so EV fires, they're like, "Oh, electric cars, they 00:11:44,620 --> 00:11:54,340 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:11:45,000 --> 00:11:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:11:46,000 --> 00:11:56,000 John: catch on fire a lot and they're really, really dangerous," and so on and so forth. And I 00:11:54,340 --> 00:11:58,380 John: always suspected that was BS because the number of cars I've seen on the side of a road that 00:11:58,380 --> 00:12:04,220 John: have burnt out, and even one time I drove past a car that was currently on fire, gasoline 00:12:04,220 --> 00:12:12,180 Vic: I was gonna say, I'll bet it ran on some sort of dinosaur fuel. 00:12:12,000 --> 00:12:16,000 John: powered, petrol powered car. Yeah, exactly. People don't realize that they forget. And 00:12:12,180 --> 00:12:21,140 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:12:16,000 --> 00:12:17,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:12:17,000 --> 00:12:27,000 John: I know that when they went away from single skin to double skin fuel tanks, and there 00:12:21,140 --> 00:12:28,860 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:12:27,000 --> 00:12:42,000 John: are improvements to the placing of fuel lines and everything in a car and fuel injectors 00:12:28,860 --> 00:12:33,940 John: versus carburetors, and that they're all incremental improvements in safety and such for resilience. 00:12:33,940 --> 00:12:40,020 John: Firewalls, for example, for protecting occupants and so on. But the bottom line is that I found 00:12:40,020 --> 00:12:47,140 Vic: Mm. 00:12:42,000 --> 00:12:43,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:12:43,000 --> 00:12:53,000 John: an article, I mean, it is an Australian article that's referencing an American study. So the 00:12:47,140 --> 00:12:52,780 John: link is to the Australian article, but the American study that this came from is in there 00:12:52,780 --> 00:12:58,740 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:12:53,000 --> 00:13:05,000 John: anyway. So they found that petrol and diesel vehicles experienced 1,530 fires per 100,000 00:12:58,740 --> 00:13:05,300 Vic: Right. 00:13:05,000 --> 00:13:06,000 John: vehicles, whereas only 25 out of 100,000 electric vehicles caught fire. That's fully electric 00:13:05,300 --> 00:13:11,060 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:13:06,000 --> 00:13:12,000 John: vehicles too. So I think that that's good to clear up some fear, uncertainty, and doubt 00:13:11,060 --> 00:13:18,660 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:13:12,000 --> 00:13:13,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:13:13,000 --> 00:13:38,000 John: that's often spread about electric vehicles. But of course, me being me, it's not entirely 00:13:18,660 --> 00:13:23,020 John: that simple. And I kind of know that because that's not fair from the point of view of 00:13:23,020 --> 00:13:28,180 John: there's no breakdown of the age of those cars. So the chances that a brand new car that's 00:13:28,180 --> 00:13:33,540 John: gasoline powered is going to catch on fire is much lower than one that's 10 years old. 00:13:33,540 --> 00:13:36,900 John: I think that's fair to say, because like rubber deteriorates and damage happens. So the number 00:13:36,900 --> 00:13:44,980 Vic: Correct. 00:13:38,000 --> 00:13:39,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:13:39,000 --> 00:13:52,000 John: of electric vehicles out there would not be 10 years old. I mean, there'd be some that 00:13:44,980 --> 00:13:49,380 John: are 10 years old, absolutely, but there would not be very many. So yeah, you're not going 00:13:49,380 --> 00:13:55,220 Vic: A few tests, listen, search, yeah. 00:13:52,000 --> 00:13:54,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:13:54,000 --> 00:13:55,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:13:55,000 --> 00:14:05,000 John: to have a 10 year old, well, you're going to have some 10 year old Teslas because the 00:13:55,220 --> 00:13:59,740 John: first Model S was sold in 2014. So you will actually, but you're not going to have that 00:13:59,740 --> 00:14:04,180 John: many. So saying like a hundred thousand new cars of either type, it's like that. So I 00:14:04,180 --> 00:14:14,100 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:05,000 --> 00:14:28,000 John: realize there's a flaw in that. And I suspect the number of EVs that are of the same age 00:14:14,100 --> 00:14:19,940 John: would actually have more than 25 out of a hundred thousand vehicles would have caught 00:14:19,940 --> 00:14:24,460 John: fire. I don't think it'd be like an order of magnitude or two orders of magnitude more, 00:14:24,460 --> 00:14:30,540 Vic: Mm. 00:14:28,000 --> 00:14:29,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:29,000 --> 00:14:32,000 John: but it would certainly be a lot more, but it should still be less. Yeah, exactly. You 00:14:30,540 --> 00:14:47,940 Vic: Maybe. 00:14:32,000 --> 00:14:33,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:33,000 --> 00:14:35,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:14:35,000 --> 00:14:36,000 Vic: I mean, well, the bottom line is, you know, when you're talking about petrol and diesel vehicles, I mean, the principle behind the whole thing is that the stuff is flammable. 00:14:36,000 --> 00:14:45,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:14:45,000 --> 00:14:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:46,000 --> 00:14:50,000 John: light that stuff up, it goes bang inside an enclosed space, drives a piston, makes you 00:14:47,940 --> 00:14:52,500 Vic: Yeah. 00:14:50,000 --> 00:14:51,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:51,000 --> 00:14:57,000 John: go. Yeah. So it's kind of like, "Hmm, is this stuff volatile?" Anyway. But I mean, this 00:14:52,500 --> 00:14:59,260 Vic: Yeah. 00:14:57,000 --> 00:14:58,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:14:58,000 --> 00:15:14,000 John: is the thing that people need to get a grip on. And that is that any device that's capable 00:14:59,260 --> 00:15:03,660 John: of storing energy is capable of releasing that energy in a very rapid fashion if something 00:15:03,660 --> 00:15:10,980 John: goes wrong. And that something that goes wrong will vary depending upon the technology. Like 00:15:10,980 --> 00:15:15,260 Vic: Right. 00:15:14,000 --> 00:15:15,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:15:15,000 --> 00:15:20,000 John: in a new case of a nuclear reactor, just pull all the control rods out and see what happens. 00:15:15,260 --> 00:15:19,060 John: They did that at Chernobyl and it went real well. Anyway. Indeed. Indeed. All right. And 00:15:19,060 --> 00:15:31,780 Vic: No, no, I saw some things that taught me that was not a good thing to do. 00:15:20,000 --> 00:15:26,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:15:26,000 --> 00:15:29,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:15:29,000 --> 00:15:39,000 John: speaking of electric vehicles, one of the long anticipated vehicles from Tesla finally 00:15:31,780 --> 00:15:37,220 John: got released since we last spoke. And that is the Cybertruck. What are your thoughts 00:15:37,220 --> 00:15:43,060 Vic: Oh, boy. 00:15:39,000 --> 00:15:41,000 Vic: No. 00:15:41,000 --> 00:15:42,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:15:42,000 --> 00:15:45,000 John: and thoughts on the Cybertruck, Vic? Yeah. Yeah. See, I 00:15:43,060 --> 00:16:13,020 Vic: I, mm, that thing is god awful ugly, man. 00:15:45,000 --> 00:15:49,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:15:49,000 --> 00:15:50,000 Vic: It's just god awful. 00:15:50,000 --> 00:15:52,000 Vic: If I were in the market, I am actually in the market for a pickup truck. 00:15:52,000 --> 00:15:56,000 Vic: I'm sorry, Scott, because he's going to hate to hear that because it's been a point of contention. 00:15:56,000 --> 00:16:01,000 Vic: But if I were in the market for an EV truck, I've actually been pretty impressed with the Chevy Silverado EV. 00:16:01,000 --> 00:16:09,000 Vic: The Cybertruck is god awful ugly, man. 00:16:09,000 --> 00:16:12,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:16:12,000 --> 00:16:13,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:16:13,000 --> 00:16:26,000 John: think that the problem with the Cybertruck and its looks is that if you're trying to 00:16:13,020 --> 00:16:18,140 John: go for mass adoption, having something that is that striking and that polarizing, that's 00:16:18,140 --> 00:16:25,020 John: going to work against you because you're going to be trying to normalize and get... It does. 00:16:25,020 --> 00:16:32,860 Vic: It looks like it's from a Mad Max movie, man. 00:16:26,000 --> 00:16:30,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:16:30,000 --> 00:16:31,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:16:31,000 --> 00:16:35,000 John: It does a bit, yeah. I'd say more Blade Runner, but I mean, the reality is that, well, yeah, 00:16:32,860 --> 00:16:39,660 Vic: Oh, that's the same difference. 00:16:35,000 --> 00:16:37,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:16:37,000 --> 00:16:38,000 Vic: I mean, not the same difference, but, you know, yeah. 00:16:38,000 --> 00:16:42,000 John: it has some things in common. I mean, I guess my point is if in fact you're trying to get 00:16:39,660 --> 00:16:46,060 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:16:42,000 --> 00:16:52,000 John: as many of these out there as possible to solve the, "I want to build a truck, that 00:16:46,060 --> 00:16:52,300 John: pickup truck that the majority of Americans are going to want to buy instead of their 00:16:52,300 --> 00:16:56,420 John: traditional gasoline powered counterparts," making it look like something like that is 00:16:56,420 --> 00:17:02,140 John: probably not... Making it look like something that's completely fundamentally different, 00:17:02,140 --> 00:17:07,620 John: you then force people who would ordinarily buy a Chevy Silverado or a Ford F-150, and 00:17:07,620 --> 00:17:14,620 John: they're going to look at this and they're going to say, "This thing looks terrible. 00:17:14,620 --> 00:17:16,860 John: I'm not buying that crap." People that buy pickup trucks don't always buy them because 00:17:16,860 --> 00:17:22,300 John: they want to be looked at. They buy them because they're practical and they're a truck. They 00:17:22,300 --> 00:17:28,700 John: don't have to have a presence. You know what I mean? I don't know. Some people get off 00:17:28,700 --> 00:17:33,820 John: on people staring at them. When I first got my Model 3 here in Australia, 00:17:33,820 --> 00:17:39,100 John: it was the first few months that the Model 3 was available. I was not the first. I was 00:17:39,100 --> 00:17:44,300 John: probably the... In Queensland, I was probably in the first thousand or two. It's not like 00:17:44,300 --> 00:17:53,420 John: you're... How do I put this? It's like I did get people staring at me and waving and pointing 00:17:53,420 --> 00:18:01,540 John: for the first few months, but after six months, there were so many of them on the road, it 00:18:01,540 --> 00:18:05,820 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:02,000 --> 00:18:06,000 John: just stopped. The Cybertruck strikes me as the sort of car that because it is so different, 00:18:05,820 --> 00:18:12,180 Vic: Right. 00:18:06,000 --> 00:18:07,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:07,000 --> 00:18:17,000 John: you're going to get that for years. Some people don't want that. It made me feel a bit uncomfortable 00:18:12,180 --> 00:18:16,540 John: sometimes because I'm just trying to go to the shops, mate. Don't stop me and have a 00:18:16,540 --> 00:18:21,580 Vic: Right. 00:18:17,000 --> 00:18:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:18,000 --> 00:18:26,000 John: conversation about my car. I just want to go and buy some butter. What gives? 00:18:21,580 --> 00:18:27,660 Vic: Yeah. 00:18:26,000 --> 00:18:27,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:27,000 --> 00:18:37,000 John: Anyway. Yeah. So, bottom line, Cybertruck is on sale. A part of me wants one. A part 00:18:27,660 --> 00:18:34,100 John: of me measured their garage. Oh, actually, no. That was a... Yeah. I guess technically 00:18:34,100 --> 00:18:38,540 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:37,000 --> 00:18:43,000 John: it was a part of me and the measuring tape. I measured my garage and it won't fit. It'll 00:18:38,540 --> 00:18:44,380 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:18:43,000 --> 00:18:47,000 John: fit in my shed. Just. But yeah, it's a beast of a thing, eh? It's a beast of a thing. Honestly, 00:18:44,380 --> 00:18:55,260 Vic: Yeah. 00:18:47,000 --> 00:18:48,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:18:48,000 --> 00:18:58,000 John: American pickup trucks are insanely huge. There's so few places in Australia where those 00:18:55,260 --> 00:19:02,340 John: cars would fit because all of our cars are all based on... We did have bigger cars for 00:19:02,340 --> 00:19:09,100 John: a while. Australian-made cars were bigger, but the Japanese won out because the Japanese 00:19:09,100 --> 00:19:14,860 John: cars were, quite frankly, cheaper, more reliable, and more economical. So, that's why people 00:19:14,860 --> 00:19:21,020 John: went for them. So, more than, I think, 60% of the cars that we have in Australia are 00:19:21,020 --> 00:19:26,900 John: Japanese and those cars are just smaller by design. So, these big American pickups, we 00:19:26,900 --> 00:19:32,500 John: look at them and they won't fit in 80, 90% of the car parks, unless you go into the handful 00:19:32,500 --> 00:19:38,340 John: of Costco's that are out there. There's a handful of other newer shopping centers that 00:19:38,340 --> 00:19:42,060 John: got wider car park spaces for them. But otherwise, you'll park in a car park and you don't have 00:19:42,060 --> 00:19:46,980 John: to take up two spots. Otherwise, you won't be able to open the doors to get out. It's 00:19:46,980 --> 00:19:50,260 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:19:48,000 --> 00:19:53,000 John: just not going to work. So, anyway. I would like one, I think. Yeah, well, maybe. Good 00:19:50,260 --> 00:20:06,180 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:19:53,000 --> 00:20:03,000 John: luck scratching that thing. I tell you what, though, if it does get scratched, good luck 00:20:06,180 --> 00:20:10,260 John: getting a scratch out. Oh, funny thing. You know what? As much as people like to take 00:20:10,260 --> 00:20:19,180 John: the piss out of Tesla, they are so good at taking the piss out of themselves. It's like 00:20:19,180 --> 00:20:24,620 John: on the touchscreen in the Tesla, you can actually open up a page on there that shows you an 00:20:24,620 --> 00:20:31,780 John: isometric view of your car and you can spin the car around and just have a look at it 00:20:31,780 --> 00:20:36,380 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:20:33,000 --> 00:20:41,000 John: and it's like, "Oh, that's kind of cool." Like a 3D model sort of thing, right? And 00:20:36,380 --> 00:20:41,260 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:20:41,000 --> 00:20:51,000 John: on the Cybertruck, they have exactly the same thing. But there's a hidden Easter egg in 00:20:41,260 --> 00:20:46,060 John: the Cybertruck. If you actually go into the Cybertruck's 3D model and you tap and keep 00:20:46,060 --> 00:20:52,140 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:20:51,000 --> 00:20:55,000 John: tapping on the glass, on the side window glass, it smashes. It comes up and it goes, "Yeah." 00:20:52,140 --> 00:21:00,780 Vic: Does it break? 00:20:55,000 --> 00:20:57,000 Vic: Nice. 00:20:57,000 --> 00:20:58,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:20:58,000 --> 00:21:00,000 Vic: Well, at least I've got a sense of humor. 00:21:00,000 --> 00:21:02,000 John: It's like so good. And you can buy. I know, right? It's like for all the crap that people 00:21:00,780 --> 00:21:06,980 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:21:02,000 --> 00:21:12,000 John: lay on Tesla and everything and Elon Musk's an idiot and whatever the hell people say, 00:21:06,980 --> 00:21:11,980 John: it's like the haters are going to hate, but you can't deny the fact that at least they 00:21:11,980 --> 00:21:16,740 John: don't try to bury stuff. At least they're being honest and they're owning it. And I 00:21:16,740 --> 00:21:20,700 John: respect that. It takes a certain kind of company attitude to be able to laugh at yourself and 00:21:20,700 --> 00:21:28,500 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:21:22,000 --> 00:21:34,000 John: say, "Maybe throwing a massive ball bearing into the glass was not a good demo to do on 00:21:28,500 --> 00:21:33,020 John: the live stage." Anyway, it's so funny. And it wasn't scripted, eh? It wasn't. Because 00:21:33,020 --> 00:21:41,580 Vic: No, it was not. 00:21:34,000 --> 00:21:37,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:21:37,000 --> 00:21:44,000 John: Elon Musk is like, "Oh my f***ing God." The look on his face, he's been saying, "Yeah, 00:21:41,580 --> 00:21:48,660 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:21:44,000 --> 00:21:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:21:46,000 --> 00:21:49,000 John: it's bulletproof." Oh my f***ing God. No, no, no, no. Anyway, moving on. Now, last time 00:21:48,660 --> 00:22:00,220 Vic: I can't imagine any circumstances where they would have done that on purpose. 00:21:49,000 --> 00:21:53,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:21:53,000 --> 00:22:06,000 John: we spoke on Is This The Show, which is episode five, I was complaining about a whole bunch 00:22:00,220 --> 00:22:05,460 John: of stuff. Specifically, one of them though, I was complaining about Nova. And I was saying, 00:22:05,460 --> 00:22:11,980 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:22:06,000 --> 00:22:16,000 John: "Oh, yeah, I can't really justify buying Nova because it's expensive. It's like $9.99 US 00:22:11,980 --> 00:22:20,620 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:22:16,000 --> 00:22:29,000 John: and every year if I want updates, I got to pay it again. I don't know how I should get 00:22:20,620 --> 00:22:24,060 John: use out of it." Well, the truth is that once I configured it the way I liked it, I kept 00:22:24,060 --> 00:22:31,980 Vic: Uh-huh. 00:22:29,000 --> 00:22:33,000 John: using it and then I kept using it. And then I'm like, "Damn, this is so good." And so 00:22:31,980 --> 00:22:39,740 Vic: It's really nice, John. 00:22:33,000 --> 00:22:35,000 Vic: It's really nice. 00:22:35,000 --> 00:22:36,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:22:36,000 --> 00:22:42,000 John: I bought it. I caved in and I bought it. And I don't regret it. It's... yeah. Oh no. Oh 00:22:39,740 --> 00:22:58,460 Vic: It's a great text editor. 00:22:42,000 --> 00:22:44,000 Vic: You've got terminals built in local and remote. 00:22:46,000 --> 00:22:49,000 Vic: You've got local and remote file browsers built in. 00:22:49,000 --> 00:22:53,000 Vic: It's basically got transmit built in, honestly. 00:22:53,000 --> 00:22:56,000 Vic: It's just, it's really nice. 00:22:56,000 --> 00:22:58,000 Vic: And there's a pretty good set of extensions and extension library for it. 00:22:58,000 --> 00:23:02,000 John: yeah, it does. Yeah. It truly is amazing as an app. And it is honestly... yeah. I don't 00:22:58,460 --> 00:23:12,380 Vic: Depending on what you're working on, you can find a lot of things to help with that. 00:23:02,000 --> 00:23:06,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:23:06,000 --> 00:23:34,000 John: regret buying it now. Well, paying for it for 12 months. And it's been fantastic. Hasn't 00:23:12,380 --> 00:23:18,420 John: missed a beat. It doesn't chew up memory the way Adam did, which is great. And it gives 00:23:18,420 --> 00:23:24,820 John: me nicer choices and it's just easy to configure. And I'm not moving back. And the latest update, 00:23:24,820 --> 00:23:30,900 John: which I forget the version number of it, but the latest update, .8. I think it might be 00:23:30,900 --> 00:23:35,380 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:23:34,000 --> 00:23:36,000 John: 10.8, whatever the latest update is. They really improved their Git integration as well. 00:23:35,380 --> 00:23:40,700 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:23:36,000 --> 00:23:40,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:23:40,000 --> 00:23:42,000 John: So you can have a look at your commit tree comments and branches and everything. And 00:23:40,700 --> 00:23:44,180 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:23:42,000 --> 00:23:46,000 John: it is so sweet. All within Nova. So, yep. Hats off to Panic. Honestly, it is a great 00:23:44,180 --> 00:23:51,260 Vic: Yeah. 00:23:46,000 --> 00:23:48,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:23:48,000 --> 00:24:00,000 John: app and it is worth it, I think. Even though I was humming and harring and I was annoyed 00:23:51,260 --> 00:23:55,580 John: at the time. I did it anyway. And the fact that I did it anyway is a testament to how 00:23:55,580 --> 00:24:00,060 Vic: Yeah. 00:24:00,000 --> 00:24:01,000 John: good it is, I think. So, yes. Yeah. Yeah. No, it is a fantastic app. So I just wanted 00:24:00,060 --> 00:24:24,100 Vic: I mean, honestly speaking, the subscription pricing on it does kind of hurt. 00:24:01,000 --> 00:24:06,000 Vic: But if you're gonna get use out of it and really appreciate it, 00:24:06,000 --> 00:24:11,000 Vic: that's not too bad of a price for the kind of tool that it is. 00:24:11,000 --> 00:24:15,000 Vic: It's very nice. 00:24:15,000 --> 00:24:17,000 Vic: And it's just, nothing comes close to it to me. 00:24:17,000 --> 00:24:22,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:24:22,000 --> 00:24:46,000 John: to mention by way of, yes, I finally pulled the trigger and I rescind my previous frustration. 00:24:24,100 --> 00:24:30,060 John: I just did it. Anyway. All right. Moving on. So I want to start now talking about the first 00:24:30,060 --> 00:24:38,460 John: thing, which is last time we spoke on this show, we talked about my impending arrival 00:24:38,460 --> 00:24:44,580 John: of an iPhone 15 Pro Max. So, yes. So I did actually buy one only a few days afterwards, 00:24:44,580 --> 00:24:55,660 Vic: Correct. 00:24:46,000 --> 00:24:48,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:24:48,000 --> 00:24:58,000 John: after we recorded, I believe. So I know that was a few months ago, but I have been using 00:24:55,660 --> 00:25:01,940 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:24:58,000 --> 00:25:00,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:25:00,000 --> 00:25:28,000 John: my iPhone 15 Pro Max now for a couple of months, with its leather case. Sorry, guy. And it 00:25:01,940 --> 00:25:09,060 John: is, it's, I mean, honestly, of course I'm going to say this because the phone I have 00:25:09,060 --> 00:25:14,260 John: now is my favorite phone of all time. Like my favorite lens and the camera is the newest 00:25:14,260 --> 00:25:19,620 John: one I just bought. So, but this, this phone, my only complaint with the Max size has always 00:25:19,620 --> 00:25:26,060 John: been damn it's heavy. And so if I put it in shorts that I'm wearing and those shorts don't 00:25:26,060 --> 00:25:31,220 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:25:28,000 --> 00:25:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:25:30,000 --> 00:25:38,000 John: have like original elastic that actually holds up, it just, my pants start falling down, 00:25:31,220 --> 00:25:38,260 Vic: Mm. 00:25:38,000 --> 00:25:40,000 John: it's, it's like, the thing is a brick. I didn't, no, no screw belts. I'll do belts for work. 00:25:38,260 --> 00:25:48,460 Vic: Gonna need a belt. 00:25:40,000 --> 00:25:42,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:25:42,000 --> 00:25:45,000 Vic: No. 00:25:45,000 --> 00:25:47,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:25:47,000 --> 00:25:50,000 John: That's it. Anyway, so, no, this is my back pocket. That is my back pocket. I'm talking 00:25:48,460 --> 00:25:59,500 Vic: Is it any better if you put it in your back pocket? 00:25:50,000 --> 00:25:53,000 Vic: Sorry, Clay. 00:25:53,000 --> 00:25:55,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:25:55,000 --> 00:25:56,000 Vic: Okay, this is your back pocket. 00:25:56,000 --> 00:25:58,000 Vic: All right, carry on. 00:25:58,000 --> 00:26:00,000 John: about my back pocket. Yeah. Anyway. All right. So bottom line is it is an amazing phone and 00:25:59,500 --> 00:26:05,940 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:26:00,000 --> 00:26:15,000 John: comparing it to an iPhone 12, which is a three year jump, clearly I'm going to say that. 00:26:05,940 --> 00:26:11,300 John: So I've done a lot of video and I've done a lot of photos with it and I've been comparing 00:26:11,300 --> 00:26:17,660 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:26:15,000 --> 00:26:17,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:26:17,000 --> 00:26:21,000 John: them in so like daylight, low light conditions, yeah, both video and still photos in both. 00:26:17,660 --> 00:26:26,700 Vic: Oh. 00:26:21,000 --> 00:26:23,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:26:23,000 --> 00:26:32,000 John: And I've also been doing some spatial videos, which we'll talk about later on. But for the 00:26:26,700 --> 00:26:32,300 Vic: Okay. 00:26:32,000 --> 00:26:34,000 John: moment, I guess my, my, my thinking, my thoughts on the camera is I was, I was buying it mainly 00:26:32,300 --> 00:26:41,220 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:26:34,000 --> 00:26:56,000 John: for the ability to do zoomed in video so that I could take it into indoor sports without 00:26:41,220 --> 00:26:46,820 John: having to sign the damn waiver saying, yeah, here's a blood sample, here's a DNA sample, 00:26:46,820 --> 00:26:52,340 John: here's a whatever sample, you know, driver's license, sign your life away. So I can now 00:26:52,340 --> 00:26:57,940 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:26:56,000 --> 00:26:58,000 John: go into these games and not have to worry about any of that, which is great. And there's 00:26:57,940 --> 00:27:02,660 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:26:58,000 --> 00:27:00,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:27:00,000 --> 00:27:02,000 Vic: I'm assuming we're talking about that new 5x lens. 00:27:02,000 --> 00:27:06,000 John: plenty of other parents that do exactly what I do. Yes. Although for indoor, for indoor 00:27:02,660 --> 00:27:08,700 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:27:06,000 --> 00:27:19,000 John: basketball, unless I'm right down the other end of the court, 2X is fine of the other 00:27:08,700 --> 00:27:13,780 John: end of the court and they're playing down the other end at the moment, then that's the 00:27:13,780 --> 00:27:16,740 John: only time I'd need the 5X. 2X is generally enough when I'm doing video. So 5X is great 00:27:16,740 --> 00:27:24,980 Vic: Mm. 00:27:19,000 --> 00:27:21,000 Vic: That's cool. 00:27:21,000 --> 00:27:23,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:27:23,000 --> 00:27:35,000 John: for cricket. If I'm out in the boundary line, it gives passable video. It's not as good 00:27:24,980 --> 00:27:29,680 John: obviously as 300 or 400 mil lenses that I've had in the past for my other camera, but it 00:27:29,680 --> 00:27:35,340 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:27:35,000 --> 00:27:37,000 John: is much nicer video in my opinion, because they, all of Apple's, I don't know, they do 00:27:35,340 --> 00:27:46,220 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:27:37,000 --> 00:27:47,000 John: a lot of video image processing and stuff. So they, they've got a lot of that. Whereas 00:27:46,220 --> 00:27:51,860 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:27:47,000 --> 00:27:49,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:27:49,000 --> 00:27:57,000 John: I don't think that the Nikon is as good at it. So I don't know, I don't know how to describe 00:27:51,860 --> 00:27:59,700 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:27:57,000 --> 00:27:59,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:27:59,000 --> 00:28:09,000 John: it, but 4K video out of my phone and 120 mil on the 5X is better than the equivalent out 00:27:59,700 --> 00:28:05,620 John: of my Nikon. So take what you will from that. The flip side of it though, is the photos, 00:28:05,620 --> 00:28:15,140 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:28:09,000 --> 00:28:11,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:28:11,000 --> 00:28:21,000 John: well they aren't. So in low light, in daylight conditions, it's not as, it's no contest in 00:28:15,140 --> 00:28:25,100 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:28:21,000 --> 00:28:23,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:28:23,000 --> 00:28:33,000 John: daylight conditions. I could use either and you wouldn't be able to tell the difference. 00:28:25,100 --> 00:28:30,300 John: So having the Nikon there with me is not going to get me that much better a photo than I 00:28:30,300 --> 00:28:36,940 Vic: Yeah. 00:28:33,000 --> 00:28:41,000 John: can take with my phone in good lighting conditions, which is great. But at nighttime, still photos 00:28:36,940 --> 00:28:44,620 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:28:41,000 --> 00:28:49,000 John: on the iPhone 15 are absolutely terrible of moving action. It's just, you don't even bother. 00:28:44,620 --> 00:28:51,300 Vic: Right. 00:28:49,000 --> 00:28:51,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:28:51,000 --> 00:28:57,000 John: I tried it just to prove my point. There's just not enough light. It just, it just not 00:28:51,300 --> 00:28:56,820 John: enough. It will not work. Yeah, if you stay still, that's fine. If you're moving, it will 00:28:56,820 --> 00:29:10,500 Vic: Yeah. 00:28:57,000 --> 00:28:58,000 Vic: I think all of their algorithms and stuff focus on still photography for low light. 00:28:58,000 --> 00:29:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:29:05,000 --> 00:29:12,000 John: simply be terrible. So there is no substitute for having a camera, like an 85 millimeter 00:29:10,500 --> 00:29:19,100 Vic: Right. 00:29:12,000 --> 00:29:14,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:29:14,000 --> 00:29:32,000 John: F 1.8 lens. You will not beat that or a 70 to 200 F 2.8 or F2 if you're good enough to 00:29:19,100 --> 00:29:25,780 John: afford something like that. You cannot beat that if you're trying to take still photos 00:29:25,780 --> 00:29:31,460 John: in low light conditions. So that still wins, but for video, it's fine. And I suspect the 00:29:31,460 --> 00:29:37,200 Vic: Mm. 00:29:32,000 --> 00:29:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:29:34,000 --> 00:29:42,000 John: reason is because there's a lot of computational video going on in the background on the phone. 00:29:37,200 --> 00:29:43,500 Vic: Mm. 00:29:42,000 --> 00:29:44,000 John: So it'll probably comparing like previous frame to next frame and compensating for lighting 00:29:43,500 --> 00:29:49,200 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:29:44,000 --> 00:29:50,000 John: levels and you'd, and if you do it, yeah. And if you actually pause and try and extract 00:29:49,200 --> 00:29:55,380 Vic: Right. 00:29:50,000 --> 00:29:52,000 Vic: Just doing a lot of cleanup. 00:29:52,000 --> 00:29:54,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:29:54,000 --> 00:30:19,000 John: a frame, it's no better than an, a still photo. So it's a little bit mind bending, but because 00:29:55,380 --> 00:30:01,260 John: you're, because it's moving video, the resolute, the sharpness of it is less apparent. So in 00:30:01,260 --> 00:30:09,340 John: any case, I'm happy with it in that regard, but it will never replace my Nikon for still 00:30:09,340 --> 00:30:15,380 John: photos in low light. It will never do it for sports, but that's okay. I kind of figured 00:30:15,380 --> 00:30:22,020 Vic: Mm. 00:30:19,000 --> 00:30:21,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:30:21,000 --> 00:30:36,000 John: that going in. But other than that, it's been a fantastic phone. It's, it is a little bit 00:30:22,020 --> 00:30:28,900 John: on the big and heavy side. The bigger screen has pluses and minuses. Obviously it's been 00:30:28,900 --> 00:30:34,040 John: well discussed on many, many by many people, but I did it for the 5X camera and I don't 00:30:34,040 --> 00:30:39,020 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:30:36,000 --> 00:30:38,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:30:38,000 --> 00:30:48,000 John: regret that choice. So that is now my phone for the next three years. And yeah, so there 00:30:39,020 --> 00:30:44,780 John: you go. Any thoughts or questions? I do. I'm currently enjoying the USB-C for data transfer, 00:30:44,780 --> 00:30:54,880 Vic: You got USB-C, too. 00:30:48,000 --> 00:30:51,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:30:51,000 --> 00:30:58,000 John: but I, what I want to do is I want to invest in a USB thumb drive. I have, but my problem 00:30:54,880 --> 00:31:06,080 Vic: I was gonna say, have you tried the thing where you just basically offload your video directly to external storage yet? 00:30:58,000 --> 00:31:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:05,000 --> 00:31:11,000 John: is that none of my external drives have a fast enough write speed. They're all quite 00:31:06,080 --> 00:31:10,180 John: old. I haven't bought a, an external drive recently. The only drive I bought recently 00:31:10,180 --> 00:31:15,600 Vic: Gotcha. 00:31:11,000 --> 00:31:13,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:13,000 --> 00:31:18,000 John: is connected to my lightning node and I can't really disconnect that and use it cause that 00:31:15,600 --> 00:31:21,680 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:31:18,000 --> 00:31:20,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:20,000 --> 00:31:28,000 John: will, then I'll lose all of my, I'll lose my, I'll lose my SATs. So I can't use that 00:31:21,680 --> 00:31:26,960 John: one. So I need to buy another one. Yeah, man, don't lose your SATs. But look, I, I need 00:31:26,960 --> 00:31:33,520 Vic: Don't wanna lose your sets. 00:31:28,000 --> 00:31:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:30,000 --> 00:31:31,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:31:31,000 --> 00:31:33,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:33,000 --> 00:31:38,000 John: to go and buy one, but it's not just that simple because you also need to buy one that's 00:31:33,520 --> 00:31:37,440 John: got the right shape. Cause the USB-C hole in the base of the, the case that I've got, 00:31:37,440 --> 00:31:46,360 Vic: Mm. 00:31:38,000 --> 00:31:40,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:40,000 --> 00:31:45,000 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:31:45,000 --> 00:31:47,000 John: it has an, it has like a certain shape to it. So if you don't get one that has a matching 00:31:46,360 --> 00:31:51,240 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:47,000 --> 00:31:52,000 John: shape, it won't fit. Yeah. Cause I tried, I've got a, I've got an adapter that does 00:31:51,240 --> 00:31:58,080 Vic: Some of those are kind of a tight fit, aren't they? 00:31:52,000 --> 00:31:55,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:31:55,000 --> 00:31:57,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:31:57,000 --> 00:32:02,000 John: USB-C to USB-A and it won't fit. Like it just won't fully insert when the case is on. And 00:31:58,080 --> 00:32:05,080 Vic: Mm. 00:32:02,000 --> 00:32:04,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:32:04,000 --> 00:32:14,000 John: so I've been doing my research and everything. I just haven't taken the plunge yet. I need 00:32:05,080 --> 00:32:08,640 John: a spare 60, 70 bucks. It's on the, it's on the wishlist, but not very high on the wishlist, 00:32:08,640 --> 00:32:13,440 John: I guess. Alrighty. So we'll talk about special videos in a minute. Now I don't think I've 00:32:13,440 --> 00:32:19,800 Vic: Right. 00:32:14,000 --> 00:32:16,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:32:16,000 --> 00:32:29,000 John: talked about my 3D adventures on this show with the, the, the Fujifilm FinePix Real 3D 00:32:19,800 --> 00:32:26,800 John: camera. I talked about that on Is This The Show? So I just want to give a quick rundown 00:32:26,800 --> 00:32:32,320 Vic: Mm. 00:32:29,000 --> 00:32:31,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:32:31,000 --> 00:32:41,000 John: of this. So in August last year, I bought myself a odd birthday present. I bought a, 00:32:32,320 --> 00:32:38,880 John: a 3D camera, which was the most popular, highest rated 3D camera to date and like consumer 00:32:38,880 --> 00:32:47,560 John: level. And this particular camera was notable for several reasons is it had a lenticular 00:32:47,560 --> 00:32:52,560 John: display on the back. And it also allowed you to record video in 720p as well as take 3D 00:32:52,560 --> 00:33:01,280 John: photos. And it's, it was a, it's a beautiful camera. And I, when I bought it, I got it 00:33:01,280 --> 00:33:07,160 John: secondhand at a, at a, a pawn shop, I suppose you would say. Secondhand store, whatever 00:33:07,160 --> 00:33:14,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:11,000 --> 00:33:14,000 John: you want to call it. Cost me about 200 something. I think it was 200 bucks. I forget now, something 00:33:14,000 --> 00:33:19,720 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:33:14,000 --> 00:33:16,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:16,000 --> 00:33:26,000 John: like that anyway. And I didn't notice it in the store, but the left hand lens sensor has 00:33:19,720 --> 00:33:25,520 John: a single vertical row of pixels that's dead, which you can compensate for in post-production, 00:33:25,520 --> 00:33:31,480 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:26,000 --> 00:33:32,000 John: but it's just annoying. But what I was doing is I was trying to prove to myself that 3D 00:33:31,480 --> 00:33:37,280 Vic: All right. 00:33:32,000 --> 00:33:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:34,000 --> 00:33:44,000 John: videos were worth the trouble and 3D videos as well. And my son had at the time an Oculus 00:33:37,280 --> 00:33:44,120 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:44,000 --> 00:33:50,000 John: Quest 2 and the Oculus Quest 2 now they prefer that it's called a MetaQuest because of course 00:33:44,120 --> 00:33:49,840 John: Meta bought it, AKA Facebook, AKA Zucker, whatever. Mark Zuckerberg, anyway. And so he, they, 00:33:49,840 --> 00:33:58,640 Vic: Mm. 00:33:50,000 --> 00:33:52,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:52,000 --> 00:33:53,000 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:33:53,000 --> 00:33:55,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:33:55,000 --> 00:34:05,000 John: he basically said, "Here, borrow my head, my VR headset." And I wanted to test and see 00:33:58,640 --> 00:34:03,440 John: whether or not it was actually worth it. So in order to convert the file formats on the 00:34:03,440 --> 00:34:11,200 John: 3D camera, the Fuji one, they do their own format called MPO for their video files and 00:34:11,200 --> 00:34:18,280 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:34:15,000 --> 00:34:17,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:34:17,000 --> 00:34:27,000 John: such. And the JPEGs are actually, when you open them, you can't tell that they are in 00:34:18,280 --> 00:34:22,960 John: fact 3D photos. So you had to convert them into the, the generic, what they call side 00:34:22,960 --> 00:34:28,600 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:34:27,000 --> 00:34:29,000 John: by side format. So you basically get two images, one on the left, one on the right. So it looks 00:34:28,600 --> 00:34:32,280 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:34:29,000 --> 00:34:39,000 John: like a big, long rectangle. And anyway, so what I learned and there, there's an app called 00:34:32,280 --> 00:34:39,560 John: Stereo Photomaker. It's only runs on Windows, but you can run as a crossover app on your 00:34:39,560 --> 00:34:44,520 John: Mac, which is what I did. But I tried a whole bunch of them and that was the one I preferred. 00:34:44,520 --> 00:34:49,400 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:34:49,000 --> 00:34:51,000 John: In any case, I converted all the Fuji photos across into side by side, loaded them into 00:34:49,400 --> 00:34:54,400 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:34:51,000 --> 00:35:01,000 John: this, this application on the, that I bought for the MetaQuest 2. And it's called Pegasus. 00:34:54,400 --> 00:35:04,040 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:35:01,000 --> 00:35:03,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:03,000 --> 00:35:06,000 John: So I think Pegasus, but with the word pig instead of peg. Anyway, so yeah, it's weird, 00:35:04,040 --> 00:35:09,360 Vic: Mm. 00:35:06,000 --> 00:35:08,000 Vic: Did you put lipstick on it? 00:35:08,000 --> 00:35:10,000 John: but I did not put lipsticks on my Pegasus. No, I did not. I probably could have, but 00:35:09,360 --> 00:35:14,920 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:10,000 --> 00:35:16,000 John: you know, nevermind. Anyway, so I found that video was pretty much almost a waste of time 00:35:14,920 --> 00:35:23,100 Vic: Okay. 00:35:16,000 --> 00:35:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:18,000 --> 00:35:23,000 Vic: Mm. 00:35:23,000 --> 00:35:25,000 John: on that thing. Cause the depth issue, like if you didn't have the subject right up close 00:35:23,100 --> 00:35:28,240 Vic: Yeah. 00:35:25,000 --> 00:35:27,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:27,000 --> 00:35:37,000 John: to you and you're just taking 3D film of a scene in front of you, and there was like 00:35:28,240 --> 00:35:34,480 John: a group of people that are playing cricket or they're just wandering around or doing 00:35:34,480 --> 00:35:38,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:37,000 --> 00:35:44,000 John: whatever, you lose that 3D effect. It's like, it's not very striking. It's not very compelling. 00:35:38,000 --> 00:35:43,880 John: And when I took photos of an individual subject that was right up close to me, like within 00:35:43,880 --> 00:35:49,160 Vic: Mm. 00:35:44,000 --> 00:35:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:46,000 --> 00:35:50,000 John: a few feet of the lens, that's when I'm like, whoa, this is, this is really impressive. 00:35:49,160 --> 00:35:56,880 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:35:50,000 --> 00:35:52,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:35:52,000 --> 00:36:02,000 John: Like it is very, very impressive. But I was looking at it on MetaQuest 2 and the MetaQuest 00:35:56,880 --> 00:36:03,960 Vic: Yeah. 00:36:02,000 --> 00:36:04,000 John: 2 does not have very good resolution at all. So I was really keen to see what it was like 00:36:03,960 --> 00:36:08,720 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:36:04,000 --> 00:36:14,000 John: a few months later when my son just, you know, basically caved in and bought himself a MetaQuest 00:36:08,720 --> 00:36:13,760 John: 3, which is a much newer, much higher resolution, much better headset, but still not as good 00:36:13,760 --> 00:36:21,860 Vic: Mm. 00:36:14,000 --> 00:36:16,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:36:16,000 --> 00:36:26,000 John: as an Apple Vision Pro, but certainly very, very good. And then as a comparative, I then 00:36:21,860 --> 00:36:28,260 John: loaded the same photos into the MetaQuest 3 and the ones that looked good on the MetaQuest 00:36:28,260 --> 00:36:34,280 John: 2 looked amazing on the MetaQuest 3. And I'm just like, okay, this is definitely something. 00:36:34,280 --> 00:36:40,960 Vic: Yeah. 00:36:36,000 --> 00:36:38,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:36:38,000 --> 00:36:40,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:36:40,000 --> 00:36:42,000 John: But the problem with this camera, yeah, I know. Oh, I know. Oh, it's awesome. I got 00:36:40,960 --> 00:36:53,080 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:36:42,000 --> 00:36:52,000 John: a hand-me-down of a MetaQuest 2 from my son. So that's the first time I've had a reverse 00:36:53,080 --> 00:36:58,480 John: hand down. It's kind of cool. It's a hand-me-up. Anyway, so, so there's the, the, the thing 00:36:58,480 --> 00:37:06,960 John: that's, the biggest problem I had with this camera was that the video it took was only 00:37:06,960 --> 00:37:11,640 John: 720p. And this camera was made in 2012, 2010. It had no real decent image stabilization 00:37:11,640 --> 00:37:21,520 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:37:12,000 --> 00:37:14,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:14,000 --> 00:37:27,000 John: at all. The dynamic range was, was terrible. And unless you're in really good light, it 00:37:21,520 --> 00:37:26,320 John: was, it was grainy. It took amazing 3D photos, still photos was fantastic. And the interpupillary 00:37:26,320 --> 00:37:33,760 Vic: Mm. 00:37:27,000 --> 00:37:29,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:29,000 --> 00:37:37,000 John: distance, the gap between the lenses and such to match your pupils on the Fuji was 75 millimeters, 00:37:33,760 --> 00:37:39,760 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:37:37,000 --> 00:37:39,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:39,000 --> 00:37:42,000 John: which was actually what's recommended because it'll, it'll essentially be more the average 00:37:39,760 --> 00:37:46,720 Vic: Mm. 00:37:42,000 --> 00:37:44,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:44,000 --> 00:37:49,000 John: for a human being. So what you're seeing will be more representative. Unfortunately, yes, 00:37:46,720 --> 00:37:53,760 Vic: Like the spacing between your eyes. 00:37:49,000 --> 00:37:52,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:52,000 --> 00:37:54,000 John: exactly. So in any case, I was itching once I got the, because that was one of the decisions 00:37:53,760 --> 00:38:01,840 Vic: Yeah. 00:37:54,000 --> 00:37:56,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:37:56,000 --> 00:38:06,000 John: between getting the iPhone 15 Pro or Pro Max was the ability to take spatial videos. So 00:38:01,840 --> 00:38:08,080 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:38:06,000 --> 00:38:08,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:38:08,000 --> 00:38:16,000 John: let's now talk a little bit about that. So one of the reasons I wanted to do it is because 00:38:08,080 --> 00:38:13,680 John: I wanted to continue taking spatial videos or what Apple calls spatial videos, 3D videos. 00:38:13,680 --> 00:38:20,360 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:38:16,000 --> 00:38:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:38:18,000 --> 00:38:28,000 John: Now the, the iPhone 15 Pro or Pro Max, the, the IPD, the distance between the lenses is 00:38:20,360 --> 00:38:26,480 John: only 20 millimeters, which is nearly a quarter of what that is on the Fuji. And I was highly 00:38:26,480 --> 00:38:32,960 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:38:28,000 --> 00:38:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:38:30,000 --> 00:38:43,000 John: skeptical. I mean, very, very, very skeptical that this would actually produce an effective 00:38:32,960 --> 00:38:38,840 John: 3D, 3D effect. And on the, on the plus side, you know, it's integrated into a device that 00:38:38,840 --> 00:38:49,600 Vic: Yeah. 00:38:43,000 --> 00:38:45,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:38:45,000 --> 00:39:03,000 John: I don't have to, that I'll be with me anyway, most of the time. So unlike the Fuji, which 00:38:49,600 --> 00:38:53,640 John: I got to take with me and make sure I charge it and all that other good stuff, the phone 00:38:53,640 --> 00:38:57,040 John: will be with me at all times. So, you know, the best camera being the camera that you've 00:38:57,040 --> 00:39:01,040 John: got on you, figure, you know, that's a, that's a, that's a positive. So you can do these, 00:39:01,040 --> 00:39:08,000 Vic: Right. 00:39:03,000 --> 00:39:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:39:05,000 --> 00:39:15,000 John: these on the Pro and the Pro Max. And I actually installed the public beta before it was formally 00:39:08,000 --> 00:39:13,220 John: released back in late 2023. And there's an app called Spatialify. It's currently in test 00:39:13,220 --> 00:39:21,140 John: flight and in iOS test flight, and you can convert your, your spatial video to side-by-side 00:39:21,140 --> 00:39:28,600 John: format, and then you can view it in any VR headset on the market. So that's exactly what 00:39:28,600 --> 00:39:32,600 John: I did. You can also adjust the eye distance in the app between 20 millimeters and 70 millimeters. 00:39:32,600 --> 00:39:38,580 John: It defaults to 36. I haven't actually played too much with that and looked at the resulting 00:39:38,580 --> 00:39:42,320 John: output, but I leaving it at the default of 36, the export looks fantastic and it's, it's 00:39:42,320 --> 00:39:48,640 John: not an issue. So you can also support in half side-by-side, full side-by-side, which is 00:39:48,640 --> 00:39:53,080 John: what I use, half over under and full over under, just different formats. But I ended 00:39:53,080 --> 00:39:57,240 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:39:55,000 --> 00:40:07,000 John: up using full side-by-side. It just worked best for the, for the Quest. Now, obviously 00:39:57,240 --> 00:40:02,720 John: these videos on Apple Vision Pro, they aren't going to require anything like that. It'll 00:40:02,720 --> 00:40:07,240 Vic: Right. 00:40:07,000 --> 00:40:09,000 John: be fine as it is. So you don't need to worry about it. In any case. So yes. And the other 00:40:07,240 --> 00:40:14,520 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:40:09,000 --> 00:40:19,000 John: thing that got me that I, it didn't occur to me at the time, cause I assumed, Oh, it 00:40:14,520 --> 00:40:19,000 John: records 4k video. So you'll be recording 4k, you know, spatial videos. Not true. They're 00:40:19,000 --> 00:40:24,320 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:40:19,000 --> 00:40:23,000 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:40:23,000 --> 00:40:25,000 John: only 1080p at 30 frames a second, which yeah. And I initially I'm like, Oh, that's ridiculous. 00:40:24,320 --> 00:40:31,400 Vic: I was gonna say, that's what I thought I remembered. 00:40:25,000 --> 00:40:28,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:40:28,000 --> 00:40:38,000 John: Maybe they'll, they'll, they're doing this in steps and I'll do it as a software update 00:40:31,400 --> 00:40:34,560 John: down the road. But then I sat down and did the math and I'm like, Oh yeah, okay, now 00:40:34,560 --> 00:40:38,080 John: I get it. So the problem is that the iPhone 15 Pro and Pro Max, that whilst it has three 00:40:38,080 --> 00:40:45,080 John: lenses, only two of them are genuinely side-by-side. So whilst you can correct algorithmically for 00:40:45,080 --> 00:40:53,960 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:40:48,000 --> 00:41:16,000 John: having only 20 millimeters of IPD, it's more difficult in the vertical axis to correct 00:40:53,960 --> 00:40:59,520 John: for it. So you're not going to use the zoom lens. So you end up using the one on the right 00:40:59,520 --> 00:41:04,920 John: hand side. Well, when, when your phone lenses are pointing at the subject and the phone 00:41:04,920 --> 00:41:09,120 John: screen is facing you, the one on the right hand side is the 48 megapixel, 24 millimeter 00:41:09,120 --> 00:41:17,480 Vic: Right. 00:41:16,000 --> 00:41:18,000 John: main camera. And the run on the left hand side is the ultra wide, which is only 12 megapixels. 00:41:17,480 --> 00:41:23,080 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:41:18,000 --> 00:41:38,000 John: So initially I thought, why? Well, you know, the one on the right hand side is 80, 64 by 00:41:23,080 --> 00:41:28,760 John: 60, 48 raw. And I scale it down, of course, unless you want the raw. But in any case, 00:41:28,760 --> 00:41:34,920 John: the ultra wide is 40, 32 by 30, 24. So you would think that there is enough pixels there 00:41:34,920 --> 00:41:40,720 Vic: Yeah. 00:41:38,000 --> 00:41:40,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:41:40,000 --> 00:41:46,000 John: to do 38, 40 by 21, 60, which is 4k. But what you've got to do is compensate for the fact 00:41:40,720 --> 00:41:47,440 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:41:46,000 --> 00:41:48,000 John: that the focal lengths are completely different. It's almost 50%. It's almost half. So the 00:41:47,440 --> 00:41:53,400 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:41:48,000 --> 00:42:14,000 John: ultra wide is 13 millimeters and the standard main is 24 millimeter effective. So that is 00:41:53,400 --> 00:41:59,480 John: a problem. It means that basically you have to crop in on your 13 mil and that crop in 00:41:59,480 --> 00:42:05,280 John: to meet, reach an equivalent of 24 millimeters is 2184 by 1638. So there's not enough vertical 00:42:05,280 --> 00:42:14,160 Vic: Doesn't quite make it. 00:42:14,000 --> 00:42:18,000 John: lines. No, you can't do 2160. You could interpolate, you could probably like do some weird computational 00:42:14,160 --> 00:42:23,120 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:42:18,000 --> 00:42:27,000 John: stuff, but the left hand side of it would be dodgy. So I think Apple just said, nah, 00:42:23,120 --> 00:42:30,200 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:42:27,000 --> 00:42:29,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:42:29,000 --> 00:42:31,000 John: we'll just stick with 1920 by 1080. Now, the thing that got me though, when I was doing 00:42:30,200 --> 00:42:36,880 Vic: Right. 00:42:31,000 --> 00:42:33,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:42:33,000 --> 00:42:43,000 John: all this investigation, Vic, and playing with it in the beta, I was like, oh, this video, 00:42:36,880 --> 00:42:42,120 John: this is a cool thing, right? Because there's a little image, an icon of the Apple Vision 00:42:42,120 --> 00:42:48,640 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:42:43,000 --> 00:42:45,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:42:45,000 --> 00:42:58,000 John: Pro and you can tap on that and it'll automatically default you into spatial video settings. But 00:42:48,640 --> 00:42:54,480 John: you can only do that in video. You can't do that for a still photograph. And I'm like, 00:42:54,480 --> 00:43:01,200 Vic: Really? 00:42:58,000 --> 00:43:00,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:43:00,000 --> 00:43:04,000 John: yeah, why? Why not? I mean, I can take a 3D photo with my, yeah, I know, I can take a 00:43:01,200 --> 00:43:08,960 Vic: That's a bummer. 00:43:04,000 --> 00:43:06,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:43:06,000 --> 00:43:28,000 John: 3D photo with my Fuji camera from 14 years old, 14 year old camera, and it looks great. 00:43:08,960 --> 00:43:15,880 John: Why can't I do that with this camera? It's video only. Now, I don't know why, if I'm 00:43:15,880 --> 00:43:22,600 John: missing something obvious, maybe I am, but I'm hoping that there'll be a software update. 00:43:22,600 --> 00:43:35,960 Vic: It seems if they could get that pretty good for video, 00:43:28,000 --> 00:43:32,000 Vic: then a still photo should be easier, I would think. 00:43:32,000 --> 00:43:36,000 John: I would think too, and I don't get it. I suspect that it'll come down the road, but I just, 00:43:35,960 --> 00:43:42,800 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:43:36,000 --> 00:43:47,000 John: I don't get it. I don't get it. So maybe I'm missing something obvious. I don't think so. 00:43:42,800 --> 00:43:48,280 Vic: Yeah. 00:43:47,000 --> 00:43:48,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:43:48,000 --> 00:43:56,000 John: So we'll see what happens with that. But most interested in this focus on what it can do, 00:43:48,280 --> 00:43:54,000 John: which is the video. So as I said, my son purchased a MetaQuest 3, and again, the resolution is 00:43:54,000 --> 00:44:01,480 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:43:56,000 --> 00:43:58,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:43:58,000 --> 00:44:25,000 John: fantastic. So I took and went through the same exercise, but unlike stereo photo maker, 00:44:01,480 --> 00:44:08,840 John: Spotify is actually super easy to use. You basically just say, open up my photo library 00:44:08,840 --> 00:44:14,160 John: and it'll show you all the photos that are spatial, I'm sorry, videos that are spatial, 00:44:14,160 --> 00:44:18,680 John: and you just select one and choose the export format and away you go. I just put those onto 00:44:18,680 --> 00:44:24,420 John: my Synology. So I load all of these, yeah, I load all my videos onto the Synology in 00:44:24,420 --> 00:44:32,080 Vic: That's cool. 00:44:25,000 --> 00:44:27,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:44:27,000 --> 00:44:44,000 John: the control, you go into the control panel and you go to the media indexing and you re-index 00:44:32,080 --> 00:44:36,960 John: the video folder. And then it magically shows up in the DLNA UPnP folder in Pegasus. And 00:44:36,960 --> 00:44:46,160 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:44:44,000 --> 00:44:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:44:46,000 --> 00:44:56,000 John: then you can just look at the videos. So honestly, I got, I was saying I crept up on my son. 00:44:46,160 --> 00:44:54,960 John: So my son was cooking something in the kitchen and I walked up to him taking a spatial video 00:44:54,960 --> 00:45:00,240 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:44:56,000 --> 00:45:00,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:45:00,000 --> 00:45:18,000 John: and I was getting close to him and he had the spatula and he was all, the egg flipper, 00:45:00,240 --> 00:45:04,960 John: I should say. And he was, you know, he had the flip of thing anyway. And I said, Oh, 00:45:04,960 --> 00:45:10,120 John: Hey, Hey Ben, I'm trying the spatial video thing. And he gets the spatula and he comes 00:45:10,120 --> 00:45:14,680 John: up and he's waving it right in front of my face. And I'm like, Whoa, Whoa, Whoa. You 00:45:14,680 --> 00:45:20,720 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:45:18,000 --> 00:45:20,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:45:20,000 --> 00:45:37,000 John: know, okay, let's just, you know, back off. It's all good, mate. Anyway. So then I go 00:45:20,720 --> 00:45:24,040 John: and put that video in the MetaQuest 3 and I'm watching it and it pops in my face so 00:45:24,040 --> 00:45:30,160 John: much. It felt very much like, you know, my son was essentially going to whack me in the 00:45:30,160 --> 00:45:35,760 John: face with the flipper. And so it was mind-blowingly impressive. It was seriously, honestly, and 00:45:35,760 --> 00:45:45,440 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:45:37,000 --> 00:45:41,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:45:41,000 --> 00:45:52,000 John: because it was 1080p and it was on a MetaQuest 3, the quality was exceptionally good. And 00:45:45,440 --> 00:45:53,000 Vic: That's cool. 00:45:52,000 --> 00:45:54,000 John: it's more, yeah, it's more or less at that point where I'm like, I may not get one immediately, 00:45:53,000 --> 00:45:59,840 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:45:54,000 --> 00:46:06,000 John: but I know I will eventually get an Apple Vision Pro because it will look even more 00:45:59,840 --> 00:46:03,920 John: amazing. I have no doubt about that. It's just, wow. You know? So, but the same learnings 00:46:03,920 --> 00:46:11,240 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:46:06,000 --> 00:46:08,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:46:08,000 --> 00:46:25,000 John: from the Fujifilm apply here because the laws of physics are the laws of physics. Like you 00:46:11,240 --> 00:46:15,240 John: need to get close enough to the subject such that that extra eye view gets depth perception. 00:46:15,240 --> 00:46:21,240 John: The further away you go, trigonometry tells you the angle gets too low. Yeah. And you 00:46:21,240 --> 00:46:26,600 Vic: You lose that. 00:46:25,000 --> 00:46:27,000 John: lose that depth. And there's just nothing you can do about it. It's just physics. So 00:46:26,600 --> 00:46:31,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:46:27,000 --> 00:46:37,000 John: honestly, Vic, I'm thoroughly impressed. But the questions I have, well, that's what I 00:46:31,000 --> 00:46:41,320 Vic: I wonder if they'll ever start putting a camera lens on each end of the phone for that. 00:46:37,000 --> 00:46:41,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:46:41,000 --> 00:46:44,000 John: thought they would do. And we talked about this a month ago, maybe even a year ago. And 00:46:41,320 --> 00:46:45,760 Vic: Yeah. 00:46:44,000 --> 00:46:45,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:46:45,000 --> 00:47:05,000 John: I said that it was inevitable that they were going to introduce 3D video recording and 00:46:45,760 --> 00:46:50,760 John: photo photography on iPhones to make people want an Apple Vision Pro, which is exactly 00:46:50,760 --> 00:46:56,440 John: what they did. I mean, I'm not claiming that was like, oh, hey, I predicted the future 00:46:56,440 --> 00:47:00,560 John: because it was so bleedingly obvious if you didn't see that and you just weren't thinking 00:47:00,560 --> 00:47:04,480 John: about it. But the problem is that what I got wrong is, well, why didn't they do that for 00:47:04,480 --> 00:47:09,960 Vic: Right. 00:47:05,000 --> 00:47:06,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:47:06,000 --> 00:47:13,000 John: still photos? And the other thing is, why only 1080p? So, and I'm stunned when they 00:47:09,960 --> 00:47:16,280 Vic: Right. 00:47:13,000 --> 00:47:14,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:47:14,000 --> 00:47:26,000 John: put those lenses so close together, because clearly what they're doing is they've said, 00:47:16,280 --> 00:47:20,280 John: well, we want our lenses in a lens cluster and we'll just compute our way out of it. 00:47:20,280 --> 00:47:26,000 John: So I think that if you were to have them on extreme ends of the phone, I think it would 00:47:26,000 --> 00:47:33,200 Vic: Mm, yeah. 00:47:26,000 --> 00:47:27,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:47:27,000 --> 00:47:46,000 John: actually give you slightly better 3D representation. But maybe they just figured in all of their 00:47:33,200 --> 00:47:39,200 John: testing that computationally they can adjust the IPD and they get information that's good 00:47:39,200 --> 00:47:45,360 John: enough. I don't think computation can solve the problem because it's like the whole, if 00:47:45,360 --> 00:47:50,240 Vic: Yeah, well. 00:47:46,000 --> 00:47:47,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:47:47,000 --> 00:47:58,000 John: you close your left eye and then you close your right eye, you will see different information 00:47:50,240 --> 00:47:53,840 John: because different light from a different angle is hitting the 3D, coming off the 3D object 00:47:53,840 --> 00:47:57,440 John: you're looking at. You can't fake that. You can't. Yeah. So, you know what I mean? It's 00:47:57,440 --> 00:48:03,360 Vic: Right. 00:47:58,000 --> 00:47:59,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:47:59,000 --> 00:48:03,000 Vic: Right. 00:48:03,000 --> 00:48:04,000 John: like, it's, yeah, it's never going to be quite as good, but you know what? Irrespective, 00:48:03,360 --> 00:48:09,440 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:48:04,000 --> 00:48:10,000 John: I was, yeah, I know, right. It'll be uneven, uneven, I tell you. Bottom line is that I 00:48:09,440 --> 00:48:20,480 Vic: But the ugliness of two camera bumps, John. 00:48:10,000 --> 00:48:13,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:48:13,000 --> 00:48:23,000 John: am absolutely pumped, excited about the Apple Vision Pro just for this feature alone. And 00:48:20,480 --> 00:48:28,200 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:48:23,000 --> 00:48:34,000 John: I know that there's so much more that it can do, but for me, this is its killer feature. 00:48:28,200 --> 00:48:33,240 John: It always was. I just needed to satisfy myself that it was worth it. And I think it is, even 00:48:33,240 --> 00:48:39,000 Vic: Right. 00:48:34,000 --> 00:48:35,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:48:35,000 --> 00:48:39,000 John: though I haven't tried Apple Vision Pro yet, I know that the step up from the Quest 2 to 00:48:39,000 --> 00:48:43,280 Vic: Mm. 00:48:39,000 --> 00:48:40,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:48:40,000 --> 00:48:59,000 John: the Quest 3 was massive. And the step up from the Quest 3 to the Apple Vision Pro, reportedly 00:48:43,280 --> 00:48:49,280 John: by people that have used it, is a step up again. So I have no doubt whatsoever that 00:48:49,280 --> 00:48:54,140 John: one of these is in my future. I just don't know how far down the road and which kidney 00:48:54,140 --> 00:48:57,760 John: I'm selling. But anyway. I could, yeah, I could do that too. It's only a question of 00:48:57,760 --> 00:49:07,880 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:48:59,000 --> 00:49:01,000 Vic: Thought you were gonna say which kid you're selling first. 00:49:01,000 --> 00:49:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:49:05,000 --> 00:49:07,000 Vic: Hm. 00:49:07,000 --> 00:49:08,000 John: which is more painful. And I'm like, hmm, maybe selling the kid is less painful. We'll 00:49:07,880 --> 00:49:16,480 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:49:08,000 --> 00:49:13,000 Vic: The one of mine, yeah. 00:49:13,000 --> 00:49:15,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:49:15,000 --> 00:49:29,000 John: see. Dear me. But anyway, so I guess we can talk a little bit also about the, because 00:49:16,480 --> 00:49:24,640 John: when I was doing the notes for this, the Apple Vision Pro had not actually been released 00:49:24,640 --> 00:49:29,040 Vic: Right. 00:49:29,000 --> 00:49:31,000 John: yet for sale. Now it's up for sale. Yeah, that's right. Have you had a chance to have 00:49:29,040 --> 00:49:36,360 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:49:31,000 --> 00:49:38,000 John: a look through the updated website? Why is Scott convinced you'll buy it? That is, do 00:49:36,360 --> 00:49:55,240 Vic: No, not really. 00:49:38,000 --> 00:49:39,000 Vic: I actually don't have a ton of interest in this product. 00:49:39,000 --> 00:49:43,000 Vic: Although, Scott is convinced I'm going to buy one, but I don't really have a ton of interest in it. 00:49:43,000 --> 00:49:48,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:49:48,000 --> 00:49:50,000 Vic: Because I buy everything Apple makes. 00:49:50,000 --> 00:49:52,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:49:52,000 --> 00:49:58,000 John: you have a Pro Display XDR? Do you have a Mac Pro? Anyway, rather than Scott not be 00:49:55,240 --> 00:50:07,840 Vic: I do not. 00:49:58,000 --> 00:49:59,000 Vic: I actually have a lot of things Apple makes I don't have. 00:49:59,000 --> 00:50:03,000 Vic: I do not. 00:50:03,000 --> 00:50:04,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:50:04,000 --> 00:50:05,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:50:05,000 --> 00:50:18,000 John: in the room to defend himself, I'm sure he has his reasons for thinking this. But irrespective, 00:50:07,840 --> 00:50:13,680 John: I went on the website yesterday and had a bit of a scour through it. And they've got 00:50:13,680 --> 00:50:18,880 Vic: Mm. 00:50:18,000 --> 00:50:19,000 John: a couple of videos up there, like the making of it, which is always fun to watch the making 00:50:18,880 --> 00:50:22,480 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:50:19,000 --> 00:50:29,000 John: of videos. And so the making of this thing is like, oh, cool, that's how they do that. 00:50:22,480 --> 00:50:26,840 John: And oh, wow, that seems excessive and over the top, but whatever. And yeah, so a little 00:50:26,840 --> 00:50:32,840 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:50:29,000 --> 00:50:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:50:30,000 --> 00:50:50,000 John: minute and a half thing about the making of the Apple Vision Pro, and it all looks very 00:50:32,840 --> 00:50:35,840 John: cool. But the one that's also interesting is there's a seven, eight, nine minute video, 00:50:35,840 --> 00:50:41,480 John: I forget what it is. It's like introducing Apple Vision Pro. And it's supposedly the 00:50:41,480 --> 00:50:46,800 John: first time this person has used it. So there's, I forget her name, Alexandra or something 00:50:46,800 --> 00:50:52,440 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:50:50,000 --> 00:50:51,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:50:51,000 --> 00:51:00,000 John: like that, whatever her name is, introducing it to this guy. And this guy apparently never 00:50:52,440 --> 00:50:58,600 John: used it before. And so she's like, well, you look at this and you do that and you do this 00:50:58,600 --> 00:51:02,760 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:51:00,000 --> 00:51:01,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:51:01,000 --> 00:51:14,000 John: and you do that. And it's a bit cringy, but it kind of gets the point across. Because 00:51:02,760 --> 00:51:08,680 John: I had wondered, well, how do you adjust the screen size? How do you move the windows around? 00:51:08,680 --> 00:51:14,640 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:51:14,000 --> 00:51:15,000 John: And it's like, okay, so you look at the corner and then the control will magically appear 00:51:14,640 --> 00:51:20,400 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:51:15,000 --> 00:51:25,000 John: and then you pinch and grab it as you're looking at it. And then you can drag to increase the 00:51:20,400 --> 00:51:24,360 John: size of whatever. And it's like little details like this that aren't obvious from the previous 00:51:24,360 --> 00:51:29,660 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:51:25,000 --> 00:51:26,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:51:26,000 --> 00:51:38,000 John: videos at WWDC, they walk through some of those basics. So that'll definitely help when 00:51:29,660 --> 00:51:34,920 John: people go to use this thing and understanding how to use it. 00:51:34,920 --> 00:51:38,920 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:51:38,000 --> 00:51:39,000 John: So that was good. I watched that whole thing twice just to get my head around it and it 00:51:38,920 --> 00:51:45,120 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:51:39,000 --> 00:51:54,000 John: all looks pretty good. But yeah, going through the order page. So there's three models. You 00:51:45,120 --> 00:51:50,320 John: can get a 256 gig, 512 gig and one terabyte model. Obviously each model as you go up has 00:51:50,320 --> 00:51:57,400 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:51:54,000 --> 00:51:55,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:51:55,000 --> 00:52:04,000 John: a new insane step up in price because Apple storage rip off, blah, blah, blah. Of course, 00:51:57,400 --> 00:52:08,320 Vic: Right. 00:52:04,000 --> 00:52:05,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:52:05,000 --> 00:52:07,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:52:07,000 --> 00:52:08,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:52:08,000 --> 00:52:18,000 John: of course. I mean, they're consistent, they're consistent and no, I'm not going to get anything 00:52:08,320 --> 00:52:11,800 John: more than a 256 gig. You gotta be kidding me. I don't care. I will cycle through stuff 00:52:11,800 --> 00:52:16,560 John: before I pay those prices. Thank you very much. Anyway. So the other, I don't have a 00:52:16,560 --> 00:52:26,320 Vic: Yeah. 00:52:18,000 --> 00:52:19,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:52:19,000 --> 00:52:22,000 Vic: Just curious, what is the one terabyte? 00:52:22,000 --> 00:52:25,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:52:25,000 --> 00:52:27,000 John: lot of stuff in front of me, but, and yeah. You may have to scan your face. It won't let 00:52:26,320 --> 00:52:38,240 Vic: Hold on a second, I'm looking. 00:52:27,000 --> 00:52:29,000 Vic: Get started. 00:52:29,000 --> 00:52:31,000 Vic: I'll grab an iPhone. 00:52:31,000 --> 00:52:32,000 Vic: I don't want to grab an iPhone to find the right. 00:52:32,000 --> 00:52:34,000 Vic: I, no, I don't want to scan my face. 00:52:34,000 --> 00:52:36,000 Vic: I can't. 00:52:36,000 --> 00:52:37,000 Vic: Mm. 00:52:37,000 --> 00:52:38,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:52:38,000 --> 00:52:39,000 John: you. So this is the thing, right? Is that, so when you do this, there's an app clip. 00:52:38,240 --> 00:52:53,320 Vic: Wait, wait, wait, one terabyte, 38.99. 00:52:39,000 --> 00:52:43,000 Vic: Jeez. 00:52:43,000 --> 00:52:44,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:52:44,000 --> 00:52:46,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:52:46,000 --> 00:52:48,000 Vic: I think that's a better, better price than the laptops. 00:52:48,000 --> 00:52:53,000 Vic: 34.99, 36.99, and 38.99. 00:52:53,000 --> 00:52:58,000 John: It is, but it's still not worth it. We can buy one terabyte solid state drive for under 00:52:53,320 --> 00:53:03,160 Vic: But I agree, it's not worth it. 00:52:58,000 --> 00:53:00,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:53:00,000 --> 00:53:03,000 Vic: I, yeah, I know. 00:53:03,000 --> 00:53:05,000 John: a hundred bucks. Please, you know, no, just no. Anyway. All right. So the, yeah, what 00:53:03,160 --> 00:53:10,360 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:53:05,000 --> 00:53:07,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:53:07,000 --> 00:53:33,000 John: was I going to say? Yeah, right. So the, the Apple vision pro website, when you log into 00:53:10,360 --> 00:53:15,760 John: on Apple, when you go to the Apple website, there's an app clip. And so you hold your 00:53:15,760 --> 00:53:19,920 John: phone up to the app clip. It downloads this app clip, and then it just scans your face. 00:53:19,920 --> 00:53:24,520 John: And it's very analogous. If you've got a phone has to have face ID. If you've done the face 00:53:24,520 --> 00:53:29,560 John: ID set up, that's all it is. It's effectively the same kind of thing. And you just got to 00:53:29,560 --> 00:53:34,200 Vic: Mm. 00:53:33,000 --> 00:53:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:53:34,000 --> 00:53:44,000 John: move your head around in a couple of times. And it says, yep, I got your face. And I was 00:53:34,200 --> 00:53:38,520 John: like, great, please don't do anything dodgy with that. And Apple says, yep, we've picked 00:53:38,520 --> 00:53:42,840 John: your light shield. And they're not going to tell you what the hell the light shield is, 00:53:42,840 --> 00:53:46,560 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:53:44,000 --> 00:54:09,000 John: but you know, just trust us, you know, good one. Great. Anyway. So once you've done that, 00:53:46,560 --> 00:53:52,400 John: then you go through and you select the option that you want. And then you can talk about 00:53:52,400 --> 00:53:55,680 John: your lenses. Now, the thing that's interesting is that they say very clearly in there that 00:53:55,680 --> 00:54:00,800 John: the Zeiss inserts will not work if you have a prism setting on your lens and your glasses 00:54:00,800 --> 00:54:07,680 John: prescription. Now, unfortunately for me, I lost my, it, yeah, the, the problem is it's, 00:54:07,680 --> 00:54:15,120 Vic: What does that mean? 00:54:09,000 --> 00:54:10,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:54:10,000 --> 00:54:17,000 John: I think it's a barrel correction for barrel distortion. So I didn't have time to look 00:54:15,120 --> 00:54:21,760 Vic: Mm. 00:54:17,000 --> 00:54:18,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:54:18,000 --> 00:54:26,000 John: into this before the show, cause I only went up, you know, I only looked at this yesterday, 00:54:21,760 --> 00:54:24,920 John: but and I was busy yesterday, but yeah, at this stage, my understanding is if you've 00:54:24,920 --> 00:54:29,720 Vic: Right. 00:54:26,000 --> 00:54:27,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:54:27,000 --> 00:54:44,000 John: got multifocal lenses, it's probably going to be an issue. If you wear glasses for distance 00:54:29,720 --> 00:54:36,000 John: viewing or for reading, it's not a problem, but if you've got multifocals, it's going 00:54:36,000 --> 00:54:40,480 John: to be an issue. So they basically said, if you've got a prism value, then you basically, 00:54:40,480 --> 00:54:46,640 Vic: Mm. 00:54:44,000 --> 00:54:45,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:54:45,000 --> 00:54:48,000 John: you can't get a lens for it. Sorry. So I don't know the jury's out as to how this is going 00:54:46,640 --> 00:54:53,800 Vic: Yeah. 00:54:48,000 --> 00:54:49,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:54:49,000 --> 00:54:54,000 John: to work. Correct. Yeah. So Syracuse's eyes rather like mine we have two scripts, one 00:54:53,800 --> 00:55:05,080 Vic: This is like where Syracuse was talking about, 00:54:54,000 --> 00:54:57,000 Vic: which of my prescriptions do I need? 00:54:57,000 --> 00:54:59,000 Vic: Yeah. 00:54:59,000 --> 00:55:00,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:55:00,000 --> 00:55:09,000 John: for distance viewing and one for up close, or in his case, one for computer work which, 00:55:05,080 --> 00:55:10,320 Vic: Right. 00:55:09,000 --> 00:55:10,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:55:10,000 --> 00:55:17,000 John: you know, so the way that a lot of people with this condition, you know, which is just 00:55:10,320 --> 00:55:15,680 John: called getting old, I guess everybody, oh dear, it's an inevitable condition for most 00:55:15,680 --> 00:55:29,120 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:55:17,000 --> 00:55:22,000 Vic: It's a condition we all have. 00:55:22,000 --> 00:55:24,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:55:24,000 --> 00:55:33,000 John: of us, you know? Oh my God. Anyway, nevermind. Nevermind at all. Anyhow. Yeah. Anyway. So 00:55:29,120 --> 00:55:37,160 Vic: Yeah. 00:55:33,000 --> 00:55:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:55:34,000 --> 00:55:54,000 John: yeah, we, so you can get contact lenses for your distance vision correction, and then 00:55:37,160 --> 00:55:43,240 John: when you want to do reading up close, you can then put just normal readers that you'll 00:55:43,240 --> 00:55:47,360 John: buy at the chemist or drug store and put them over the top. And that's what I did there 00:55:47,360 --> 00:55:52,560 John: for a while. But what I don't understand is, is that therefore a viable solution if you're 00:55:52,560 --> 00:55:59,660 Vic: Mm. 00:55:54,000 --> 00:55:55,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:55:55,000 --> 00:56:05,000 John: wearing the Apple Vision Pro? Like would you wear contacts for distance viewing and then 00:55:59,660 --> 00:56:03,440 John: get the readers inserts, which are only a hundred bucks US versus the prescription, 00:56:03,440 --> 00:56:08,360 Vic: Mm. 00:56:05,000 --> 00:56:06,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:56:06,000 --> 00:56:28,000 John: you know, 149s. But I'm just, like I said, I need to understand, and other people will 00:56:08,360 --> 00:56:14,400 John: figure this out. And this is one of those few things that I'm grateful that it's launching 00:56:14,400 --> 00:56:17,960 John: in the States before it's launching here. Cause I, the Americans, you're all going to 00:56:17,960 --> 00:56:22,320 John: be guinea pigs for me and you're going to figure this stuff out. So I'll just sit back 00:56:22,320 --> 00:56:26,400 John: and watch and let you work through the detail. Okay. And then once you've figured all that 00:56:26,400 --> 00:56:31,200 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:56:28,000 --> 00:56:30,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:56:30,000 --> 00:56:40,000 John: out, I'll be like, aha, now I know I need to do. So anyway, I do need to get new glasses. 00:56:31,200 --> 00:56:36,520 John: These ones are getting close to three years old. So I looked at the script the other day 00:56:36,520 --> 00:56:39,560 John: and these lenses are scratched up to hell and I need new ones. So this time I'll be 00:56:39,560 --> 00:56:44,560 Vic: Mm. 00:56:40,000 --> 00:56:41,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:56:41,000 --> 00:56:51,000 John: a little bit more careful about it, but I'd like to go in there and say, oh, you know, 00:56:44,560 --> 00:56:48,720 John: I need a copy of my prescription because last time I, they give you one when you buy the 00:56:48,720 --> 00:56:53,640 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:56:51,000 --> 00:57:14,000 John: glasses, but I've can't find it. It's, it's gone somewhere. So I need to get that again. 00:56:53,640 --> 00:56:59,560 John: So while I will ask them these questions once I know, cause I mean, it may well be that 00:56:59,560 --> 00:57:05,120 John: if you need two different kinds of lenses, the only way to do it is like I say, pop on 00:57:05,120 --> 00:57:09,640 John: contact lenses and then get the readers inserts and then you've got the full range of vision. 00:57:09,640 --> 00:57:14,560 Vic: Right. 00:57:14,000 --> 00:57:15,000 John: Otherwise it might just be that it's tuned for up close. It might be tuned for distance. 00:57:14,560 --> 00:57:18,920 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:57:15,000 --> 00:57:22,000 John: I don't know. It depends on how they've engineered it. Anyway. So yeah, finally exciting. So 00:57:18,920 --> 00:57:25,280 Vic: Yeah. 00:57:22,000 --> 00:57:23,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:57:23,000 --> 00:57:32,000 John: they'll, they'll be available on the 2nd of February, which will be probably about a week 00:57:25,280 --> 00:57:29,800 John: after this episode goes live. And yes, to all the guinea pigs out there, let me know 00:57:29,800 --> 00:57:34,880 Vic: Mm. 00:57:32,000 --> 00:57:33,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:57:33,000 --> 00:57:35,000 John: how it goes. 00:57:34,880 --> 00:57:35,320 Vic: Okay. 00:57:35,000 --> 00:57:36,000 John: Yeah. 00:57:35,320 --> 00:57:45,320 Vic: I won't be one of them. 00:57:36,000 --> 00:57:37,000 Vic: My only interest in it really is honestly, I'd like to watch TV. 00:57:37,000 --> 00:57:42,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:57:42,000 --> 00:57:44,000 Vic: But I'm also pretty fond of my actual real Dolby Atmos surround sound system. 00:57:44,000 --> 00:57:49,000 John: Yeah. 00:57:45,320 --> 00:58:01,320 Vic: And spatial audio and AirPods and stuff is really nice, but 00:57:49,000 --> 00:57:53,000 Vic: it's just not gonna compete with that. 00:57:53,000 --> 00:57:55,000 Vic: And also there's a $3,500 price tag to watch TV with it. 00:57:55,000 --> 00:57:59,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:57:59,000 --> 00:58:01,000 Vic: And then using it as an external display for my MacBook Pro would be really nice too. 00:58:01,000 --> 00:58:05,000 John: Yeah, yeah, exactly. Indeed. See the other thing to keep in mind too, Vic, is that if 00:58:01,320 --> 00:58:19,440 Vic: But again, $3,500 price tag on it. 00:58:05,000 --> 00:58:09,000 Vic: It really kind of curbs my enthusiasm for this product. 00:58:09,000 --> 00:58:13,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:58:13,000 --> 00:58:23,000 John: you want to have a, a private experience, you need your AirPods. And then what I, so 00:58:19,440 --> 00:58:24,960 Vic: Mm-hm. 00:58:23,000 --> 00:58:24,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:58:24,000 --> 00:58:33,000 John: what I had is a situation where I, my son's AirPods met the dryer. And so I bought new 00:58:24,960 --> 00:58:30,680 John: AirPods pro and gave him my old ones. Anyway. I did that two months before they released 00:58:30,680 --> 00:58:39,040 Vic: Right. 00:58:33,000 --> 00:58:34,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:58:34,000 --> 00:58:44,000 John: the USB-C version. Now I don't, there was nothing on the specs for the AirPods pro USB-C 00:58:39,040 --> 00:58:47,480 Vic: Right. 00:58:44,000 --> 00:58:45,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:58:45,000 --> 00:59:05,000 John: version that jumped out at anybody as them being different. They were just a USB-C charging 00:58:47,480 --> 00:58:52,520 John: case. Everyone just like shrugged. Let's, you know, nothing to see here. Turns out they 00:58:52,520 --> 00:58:56,880 John: put in five gigahertz into the damn AirPods. And that's what the Vision Pro will use for 00:58:56,880 --> 00:59:02,600 John: low latency audio. And I'm like, so I missed out on those AirPods by two months. I'm not, 00:59:02,600 --> 00:59:10,000 Vic: Right. 00:59:05,000 --> 00:59:06,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:59:06,000 --> 00:59:21,000 John: not that I knew I needed to wait. So it's like, if I want to have that kind of an experience, 00:59:10,000 --> 00:59:14,800 John: if I do get an Apple Vision Pro, I'm up for another set of fricking AirPods. Yay. So that's 00:59:14,800 --> 00:59:20,360 John: annoying. 00:59:20,360 --> 00:59:20,800 John: Yeah. The second gen of the second gen. Yeah, exactly. Don't call it the third gen. Aye 00:59:20,800 --> 00:59:33,920 Vic: Yeah, this is the discreetly labeled second gen, second gen. 00:59:21,000 --> 00:59:26,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 00:59:26,000 --> 00:59:28,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:59:28,000 --> 00:59:32,000 Vic: Right. 00:59:32,000 --> 00:59:33,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 00:59:33,000 --> 00:59:43,000 John: yai yai. Anyway. All right. So if you want to talk more about this, you can reach me 00:59:33,920 --> 00:59:37,920 John: on the Fediverse at [email protected] or the network at [email protected]. If 00:59:37,920 --> 00:59:44,120 John: you're enjoying Pragmatic and you'd like to support us and keep the show ad free, you 00:59:44,120 --> 00:59:47,520 John: can by becoming a premium supporter. Just visit engineer.network/pragmatic to learn 00:59:47,520 --> 00:59:52,520 John: how you can help this show to continue to be made. Thank you. A big thank you to all 00:59:52,520 --> 00:59:57,240 John: of our supporters. A special thank you to our silver producers, Mitch Bilger, Shane 00:59:57,240 --> 01:00:01,200 John: O'Neill, Lesley, Kellen Fredelius Fujimoto, Jared Roman, Joel Maher, Katarina Will, Chad 01:00:01,200 --> 01:00:06,760 John: Juring and Ian Gallagher. And an extra special thank you to our gold producer, Stephen Bridle 01:00:06,760 --> 01:00:11,960 John: and our gold producer known only as R. Pragmatic is a podcasting 2.0 enhanced show and with 01:00:11,960 --> 01:00:18,160 John: the right podcast player, you'll have episode locations, enhanced chapters and real time 01:00:18,160 --> 01:00:23,560 John: subtitles on selected episodes. And you can also stream sats and boost with messages if 01:00:23,560 --> 01:00:28,080 John: you like. There's details on how along with the Boostergram leaderboard for this and all 01:00:28,080 --> 01:00:33,080 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 01:00:33,000 --> 01:00:39,000 John: the shows on our website. If you'd like to get in touch with Vic, what's the best way 01:00:33,080 --> 01:00:37,840 John: for them to get in touch with you, mate? 01:00:37,840 --> 01:00:39,040 Vic: You can find me in most places at Big Hudson 1. 01:00:39,000 --> 01:00:42,000 John: There you go. I cringe every time I hear that domain. But anyway. Yeah. 01:00:39,040 --> 01:01:08,520 Vic: I still have a Twitter/X account, although it doesn't get a lot of use. 01:00:42,000 --> 01:00:47,000 Vic: And you can find me on the Fediverse as Big Hudson 1 at, no wait, 01:00:47,000 --> 01:00:53,000 Vic: Big Hudson 1 at app.net, that's it. 01:00:53,000 --> 01:00:58,000 Vic: Yeah, app.net. 01:00:58,000 --> 01:00:59,000 Vic: [LAUGH] 01:00:59,000 --> 01:01:02,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 01:01:02,000 --> 01:01:07,000 Vic: Right. 01:01:07,000 --> 01:01:08,000 Vic: [BLANK_AUDIO] 01:01:08,000 --> 01:01:18,000 John: Yeah, I know. That's all good. Well, a special thank you to our supporters and a big thank 01:01:08,520 --> 01:01:13,800 John: you to everyone for listening. And as always, thank you, Vic. It's always a good time having 01:01:13,800 --> 01:01:19,040 Vic: Yes, thank you for having me. 01:01:18,000 --> 01:01:21,000 Vic: I had a good time as well. 01:01:21,000 --> 01:01:22,000
Duration 1 hour, 2 minutes and 32 seconds Direct Download

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People


Vic Hudson

Vic Hudson

Vic is the host of the App Story Podcast and is the developer behind Money Pilot for iOS.

John Chidgey

John Chidgey

John is an Electrical, Instrumentation and Control Systems Engineer, software developer, podcaster, vocal actor and runs TechDistortion and the Engineered Network. John is a Chartered Professional Engineer in both Electrical Engineering and Information, Telecommunications and Electronics Engineering (ITEE) and a semi-regular conference speaker.

John has produced and appeared on many podcasts including Pragmatic and Causality and is available for hire for Vocal Acting or advertising. He has experience and interest in HMI Design, Alarm Management, Cyber-security and Root Cause Analysis.

You can find him on the Fediverse and on Twitter.